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UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 20-F

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

Commission file number: 1-33168

Grupo Aeroportuario del Centro Norte, S.A.B. de C.V.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

Central North Airport Group

(Translation of Registrant’s name into English)

United Mexican States

(Jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

Plaza Metrópoli Patriotismo, Piso 5

Av. Patriotismo 201

Col. San Pedro de los Pinos, Benito Juárez

Ciudad de México, México

(Address of principal executive offices)

Ruffo Pérez Pliego del Castillo

Plaza Metrópoli Patriotismo, Piso 5

Av. Patriotismo 201

Col. San Pedro de los Pinos, Benito Juárez

Ciudad de México, México

+ 52 81 8625 4300

rperezpliego@oma.aero

(Name, Telephone, E-mail and/or Facsimile number and Address of Company Contact Person)

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of each class:

Trading Symbol(s)

Name of each exchange on which registered

American Depositary Shares (ADSs) each representing 8 Series B shares

OMAB

The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC

Series B shares

OMAB

The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC*

*

Not for trading, but only in connection with the registration of ADSs, pursuant to the requirements of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act:

N/A

Indicate the number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of the close of the period covered by the annual report:

Title of each class:

Number of Shares

Series B shares

340,345,556

Series BB shares

49,766,000

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

 Yes  No

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Sections 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

 Yes  No

Note — Checking the box above will not relieve any registrant required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 from their obligations under those Sections.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

 Yes  No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).

 Yes  No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or an emerging growth company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer 

Accelerated filer 

Non-accelerated filer 

Emerging growth company 

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

U.S. GAAP 

IFRS 

Other 

Indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow:

 Item 17 Item 18

If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

 Yes  No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (§ 15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.  

 Yes  No


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

ITEM 1.

IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS

1

ITEM 2.

OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE

1

ITEM 3.

KEY INFORMATION

1

Selected Financial Data

1

Risk Factors

1

Forward-Looking Statements

28

ITEM 4.

INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

29

History And Development Of The Company

29

Business Overview

34

Regulatory Framework

65

Organizational Structure

83

Property, Plant And Equipment

85

ITEM 4A.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

85

ITEM 5.

OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS

85

ITEM 6.

DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES

125

ITEM 7.

MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED-PARTY TRANSACTIONS

134

Major Shareholders

134

Related-Party Transactions

136

ITEM 8.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

138

Legal Proceedings

138

Dividends And Capital Stock Reimbursements

141

ITEM 9.

THE OFFER AND LISTING

142

Share Price History

142

Trading On The Mexican Stock Exchange

142

ITEM 10.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION BYLAWS

143

Material Contracts

158

Exchange Controls

158

Taxation

158

Documents On Display

162


Table of Contents

ITEM 11.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

163

ITEM 12.

DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES

163

ITEM 12A.

DEBT SECURITIES

163

ITEM 12B.

WARRANTS AND RIGHTS

163

ITEM 12C.

OTHER SECURITIES

163

ITEM 12D.

AMERICAN DEPOSITARY SHARES

163

ITEM 13.

DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES

165

ITEM 14.

MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS

165

ITEM 15.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

165

ITEM 16.

[RESERVED]

168

ITEM 16A.

AUDIT COMMITTEE’S FINANCIAL EXPERT

168

ITEM 16B.

CODE OF ETHICS

169

ITEM 16C.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES AUDIT AND NON-AUDIT FEES

169

ITEM 16D.

EXEMPTIONS FROM THE LISTING STANDARDS FOR AUDIT COMMITTEES

169

ITEM 16E.

PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY THE ISSUER AND AFFILIATED PURCHASERS

169

ITEM 16F.

CHANGE IN REGISTRANT’S CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANT

171

ITEM 16G.

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

171

ITEM 16H.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

176

ITEM 17.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

177

ITEM 18.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

177

ITEM 19.

EXHIBITS

177


Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1.          Identity of Directors, Senior Management and Advisers

Not applicable.

Item 2.          Offer Statistics and Expected Timetable

Not applicable.

Item 3.          Key Information

RISK FACTORS

Risks Related to Our Operations

The outbreak of COVID-19 has had, and may continue to have, a negative impact on the global economy and on our business, operations and results.

The novel strain of coronavirus (“COVID-19”), first identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019, has spread to nearly all regions around the world. On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic. The outbreak, and measures taken to contain or mitigate it, have had dramatic adverse consequences for the global economy, including on demand, operations, supply chains and financial markets. COVID-19 has led to travel restrictions imposed by governments, flight cancellations, and a marked decline in passenger demand for air travel, domestically and worldwide.

On March 19, 2020, the United States issued a travel advisory recommending that travelers avoid all international travel. The following day, on March 20, 2020, the United States closed its land border with Mexico, except to essential travel and trade and commerce. As of April 22, 2021, the land border remains closed. On January 26, 2021, the United States issued a decree, requesting negative COVID-19 test results for all inbound passengers traveling by air. Beginning on January 7, 2021, Canada established similar testing requirements for passengers traveling by air to the country. Subsequently, the Canadian government suspended flights between Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean until April 30, 2021. The full effect of the travel advisories and restrictions in other countries is not yet known and could impact our international passenger levels even after formal advisories and restrictions have been lifted.

On March 31, 2020, Mexico’s Ministry of Health issued a decree suspending all non-essential activities in the country through April 30, and on April 21, such suspension was extended through May 30, 2020. As a consequence of these suspensions, total passenger traffic in our airports experienced a sharp decline. In April and May, 2020, our total terminal passenger traffic decreased 92.8% and 93.5%, respectively, compared to the same periods of 2019. On May 29, 2020, Mexico’s Ministry of Health issued a decree establishing an epidemiological risk traffic light system by region, applicable both to municipalities and states which became effective on June 1, 2020 (and which remains in place as of the date of this report) that determines the level of health risk and the type of activities authorized to take place. As a result, different states of the country are experiencing different reactivation levels and, consequently, different types of economic activities are being allowed. As a result of this gradual reactivation of economic activity by region, passenger traffic started to show signs of recovery, with monthly decreases from 84.6% in June 2020 to 41.5% in December 2020, compared to the same periods of 2019. Throughout the pandemic, airports have been considered essential and our airports have remained operational. Given that OMA operates in 9 states of Mexico, the economic reactivation level and the gradual recovery of passenger flows in our airports could vary significantly from state to state, depending on the risk level established in each of the states in which we operate, as well as those in our main destinations. In response to this material deterioration in air traffic, we have taken a number of actions to mitigate our business, operations and financial condition, including, among others, (a) the temporary reduction of certain operating areas in terminal buildings, which resulted in electricity savings and optimization of our cleaning and security crew, (b) deferral of cost in minor maintenances based on the current levels of operations, (c) headcount reduction of approximately 100 positions

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implemented in the third quarter of 2020, and (d) deferral and discount agreements with commercial and aeronautical clients. Most of our cost structure is fixed, and the impact from these measures is not expected to be significant vis a vis the potential decline in revenues resulting from the disruption in passenger traffic across the Company’s operations.

Due to measures implemented by Mexico and other countries such as “shelter in place” or quarantine requirements, international and domestic travel restrictions or advisories, limitations on public gatherings, social distancing recommendations, remote work arrangements and closures of tourist destinations and attractions, as well as passenger perceptions of the safety, ease and predictability of air travel, our main airline customers and our commercial tenants have experienced an adverse economic environment, which has led to halts of operations, restructuring processes and the interruption of commercial relationships with the Company. For example, on June 30, 2020, Aeromexico and its affiliates, which accounted for 20.3% of our total passenger traffic in 2020, filed voluntary Chapter 11 petitions in the United States to implement a financial restructuring, while continuing to operate. In addition, since December 9, 2020, Interjet, which accounted for 5.6% of our total passenger traffic in 2020, stopped operating at our airports. We cannot measure the extent of the impact in our future operations and financial results as a consequence of these processes.

Historically, a substantial majority of our revenues have been derived from aeronautical services, and our principal source of aeronautical services revenues is passenger charges (Tarifa de Uso de Aeropuerto, TUA). Passenger charges are payable for each passenger (other than diplomats, infants, transfer and transit passengers) departing from the airport terminals we operate, collected by the airlines and paid to us. In 2018, 2019 and 2020, passenger charges represented 56.2%, 58.5% and 44.7%, respectively, of our total revenues and 65.7%, 65.9% and 58.4%, respectively, of the sum of our aeronautical and non aeronautical revenues.

The full extent of the ongoing impact of COVID-19 on the Company’s longer-term operational and financial performance will depend on future developments, including those outside our control related to the efficacy and speed of vaccination programs in curbing the spread of the virus, the introduction and spread of new variants of the virus, which may be resistant to currently approved vaccines, passenger testing requirements, mask mandates or other restrictions on travel, all of which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted with certainty. Even where formal advisories and restrictions have been lifted or reduced, the increased spread or resurgence of COVID-19 could result in the reintroduction of or increase in such formal advisories and restrictions. We expect that the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to severely impact the countries and regions where we operate in 2021. Our total passenger traffic decreased 37.8% in the first quarter of 2021 compared to the first quarter of 2020. The sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues for the first quarter of 2021 were Ps. 1,189,679 thousand, as compared to Ps.1,715,650 thousand in the first quarter of 2020. We have established health and safety protocols aimed at enhancing the well-being of passengers and essential operating personnel across the airports we operate. Protective gear is required for staff working on the premises, and sanitization practices in accordance with the guidelines of local health authorities are in place. We have also implemented a remote working policy for staff where possible. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a material impact on the Company, and the continuation of reduced air travel demand could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, operating results, financial condition and liquidity.

Because our revenues are largely dependent on the level of passenger traffic in our airports, any pandemics or outbreaks of health epidemics, such as SARS, Influenza A (H1N1), Ebola, Zika, Chikungunya and COVID-19, or other such international events or threats thereof (and any related economic impact of such events) could result in decreased passenger traffic and increased costs to the air travel industry related to new regulatory procedures in order to preserve the health of the passengers and the airport community, which could not be recovered through our maximum tariffs and, as a result, could cause a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition. For more information, see “Our operations could be adversely affected due to changes in the collection of passenger charges.”

Large scale international events, including acts of terrorism, or wars, could have a negative impact on international air travel and our revenues.

Events such as the conflicts in the Middle East and terrorist attacks worldwide have negatively affected in the past the frequency and pattern of air travel worldwide.

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The terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001 had a severe adverse impact on the air travel industry, particularly on U.S. carriers and carriers operating international service to and from the United States. Airline traffic in the United States fell precipitously after the attacks. Our terminal passenger volumes declined 5.8% in 2002 as compared to 2001. Among other consequences, airport operations would be disrupted or suspended during the time necessary to conduct rescue operations, investigate the incident and repair or rebuild damaged or destroyed facilities, and our future insurance premiums would likely increase. In addition, our insurance policies do not cover all losses and liabilities resulting from terrorism. Any future terrorist attacks, whether or not involving aircraft, will likely adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

Any general increase of hostilities relating to terrorist organizations, reprisals thereof, further conflict in the Middle East, or other such international events or threats thereof, even if not made on or targeted directly at the air travel industry, or the fear of or the precautions taken in anticipation of such attack such as elevated national threat warnings, travel restrictions, selective cancellation or redirection of flights and new security regulations, among others, (and any related economic impact of such events) could result in decreased passenger traffic and increased costs to the air travel industry as a result of new security requirements and, as a result, could cause a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition. The COVID-19 outbreak has and is materially reducing demand for and availability of, worldwide air travel and could therefore continue to have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. For more information, see “The outbreak of COVID-19 has had, and may continue to have, a negative impact on the global economy and on our business, operations and results.”

Our revenues are highly dependent on levels of air traffic, which depend on factors beyond our control.

Passenger and cargo traffic volumes and air traffic movements depend on many factors beyond our control, including the COVID-19 pandemic, seasonality, severe or extreme weather, economic conditions in Mexico, the United States or globally, the political situation in Mexico and elsewhere in the world, the attractiveness of the destinations of our airports relative to that of other competing destinations, fluctuations in fuel prices (which could cause airlines to increase tariffs and have a negative impact on traffic as a result of increased fuel costs), changes in regulatory policies applicable to the aviation industry and an increase or decrease in Mexican airlines’ fleets, among others. For more information on the effect COVID-19 has had on our passenger traffic, see “The outbreak of COVID-19 has had, and may continue to have, a negative impact on the global economy and on our business, operations and results.”

Our revenues are closely linked to both passenger and cargo traffic volumes and to the number of air traffic movements at our airports. These factors directly determine our revenues from aeronautical services and indirectly determine our revenues from non-aeronautical services. Any decreases in passenger and cargo traffic volumes and the number of air traffic movements to or from our airports as a result of these factors could adversely affect our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition.

Our business could be adversely affected by global political developments, particularly with regard to U.S. policies toward Mexico.

Changes in economic, political and regulatory conditions in the United States or in U.S. laws and policies governing foreign trade and foreign relations could create uncertainty in the international markets and could have a negative impact on the Mexican economy and public finances. This correlation is due, in part, to the high level of economic activity between the two countries generally, including the trade facilitated by the North American Free Trade Agreement (“NAFTA”), as well as physical proximity.

On October 1, 2018, Mexico announced that it had reached an agreement with Canada and the United States to modernize their free trade relationship and replace NAFTA. The new agreement, which is known as the United States Mexico Canada Agreement (USMCA), was formally signed on November 30, 2018 and entered into force on July 1, 2020. We cannot predict the impact of the USMCA on particular industries or government policies and the changes to international trade that may result.

Following the U.S. elections in November 2020 and the change in the U.S. administration for the four-year period from 2021 to 2024, there is uncertainty regarding future U.S. policies with respect to matters of importance to Mexico and its economy, particularly trade and migration. Policies adopted could create tension between the Mexican

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and U.S. governments or reduce economic activity between Mexico and the United States, thus affecting the travel of passengers between those countries. For more information on travel restrictions related to COVID-19, see “The outbreak of COVID-19 has had, and may continue to have, a negative impact on the global economy and on our business, operations and results.”

Furthermore, in September 2017, the U.S. administration announced its plan to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (“DACA”), which allows certain individuals who entered the U.S. as undocumented minors to defer immediate deportation and to be eligible for a work permit. Because the majority of individuals who benefit from this program are from Mexico, terminating the program may affect relations between Mexico and the U.S., as well as transit between the two countries. On January 20, 2021, President Joe Biden issued a Memorandum for the Attorney General, and the Secretary of Homeland Security, to take action to preserve and fortify DACA, consistent with applicable law. There is still uncertainty about whether and when DACA will be ratified, and we cannot assess the impact it may have on particular industries or government policies that may result. If new federal immigration legislation is enacted in the U.S., such laws may contain provisions that could make it more difficult for Mexican citizens to travel between Mexico and the United States. Such restrictions could have a material adverse effect on our passenger traffic results. Also, the U.S. passed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act on December 22, 2017, which, among others, reduces the U.S. corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21%, and implemented new import taxes on certain goods, approved on January 22, 2018. We cannot predict the impact that these measures may have on trade between the U.S. and Mexico or whether foreign direct investment from the U.S. to Mexico will decrease.

The foregoing factors and further policy changes could have an impact on Mexico’s gross domestic product (“GDP”) growth, the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and the Mexican peso, levels of foreign direct investment and portfolio investment in Mexico, interest rates, inflation, and the Mexican economy generally; which in turn, may impact the level of passenger traffic in our airports and adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations.

Our business could be adversely affected by a downturn in the global economy, particularly with regard to the U.S. economy.

The outbreak of COVID-19 has adversely affected the economies and financial markets of many countries, including the United States and Mexico. The extent to which COVID-19 impacts these economies will depend on future developments, which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted, including the duration and scope of the outbreak and the actions taken to contain or treat the outbreak, within the United States, Mexico and around the world. As a result, it is possible that the United States and/or Mexico will experience a significant economic downturn due to the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak. The United States and Mexico technically entered into a recession in 2020 following the COVID-19 outbreak. The extent and effect of this recession is difficult to predict, including whether such recession and any recovery thereof will be similar to past periods of recession and recovery.

Moreover, international events, such as decreases in oil prices and the slower growth in the Chinese economy, have led to volatility in the international markets and adversely affected the Mexican economy. As a result, Mexico has been forced to cut public expenses, since oil output is one of the main sources of revenue in Mexico. In recent years, however, the U.S. economy has improved, with the GDP increasing at an annualized rate in real terms of 3.1% in 2018, 2.3% in 2019 and decreased 3.5% in 2020, and our international passenger traffic increasing 4.4%, 7.9% and decreased 56.9%, respectively. In the event of an economic downturn, developing countries, which have largely rebounded from the economic and financial crisis in 2009, would be impacted through trade and financial channels.

Our business is particularly dependent on the condition of the U.S. economy and is particularly influenced by trends in the United States relating to leisure travel, consumer spending and international tourism. For more information on U.S. travel restrictions related to COVID-19, see “The outbreak of COVID-19 has had, and may continue to have, a negative impact on the global economy and on our business, operations and results.” According to the Mexican National Institute of Statistics and Geography (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía), in 2020, exports from Mexico to the United States represented approximately 81.2% of Mexican exports, and 39.1 % of foreign direct investment in Mexico originated in the United States. According to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, in 2020, secondary income received from the United States, which includes government and private transfers, was approximately U.S.$17.6 billion.

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Since the demand for aeronautical services in Mexico is substantially dependent on the performance of the Mexican economy, which is in turn highly dependent on the performance of the U.S. economy, a further downturn in the U.S. economy or a disruption in commercial activities among the U.S. and Mexico could cause a material adverse effect on our results of operations, prospects and financial condition. More generally, further downturns in the global economy and/or in the Mexican economy would also adversely affect our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition. See also “—Risks Related to Mexico—The Company is significantly dependent upon the volume of air passenger traffic in Mexico, and negative economic developments in Mexico could adversely affect its business and results of operations.”

Variations in international fuel prices could directly or indirectly adversely affect our business and results of operations.

International fuel prices, which represent a significant cost for airlines, have experienced significant volatility in recent years. In the past, increased costs were among the factors leading to cancellations of routes, decreases in frequencies of flights and, in some cases, even contributed to filings for bankruptcy by some airlines. Any substantial variation in fuel prices could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Our business is highly dependent on the operations of Mexico City International Airport.

In 2018, 2019 and 2020, approximately 42.9%, 43.0% and 40.0%, respectively, of our domestic passengers flew to or from our airports via Mexico City International Airport (Aeropuerto Internacional de la Ciudad de México, S.A. de C.V.) As a result, our domestic traffic is highly dependent upon the operations of Mexico City International Airport.

On July 3, 2017, the Mexican Federal Antitrust Commission (Comisión Federal de Competencia Económica, or the “Antitrust Commission”) issued Corrective Measures for the Mexico City International Airport to address the inefficiencies observed at the airport during congested hours, limiting operations between the hours of 7:00 and 22:00. In response, on September 29, 2017, the Ministry of Communications and Transportation announced in the Federal Official Gazette the General Guidelines for the allocation of slots at congested airports (see “Risk Factors⸻The Company cannot predict how the regulations governing the business will be applied.”). The indirect effect of the new regulation in 2017 was a decrease in the number of flights and an increase in the number of flight cancellations to and from Mexico City International Airport and other regional destinations.

To alleviate congestion at the Mexico City International Airport, a new Mexico City international airport was being built and was expected to start operations in 2022. The current Mexican federal administration that took office on December 1, 2018 cancelled the construction of the new Mexico City international airport. There is still uncertainty about what effect, if any, the cancellation of the new Mexico City international airport will have on our operations and passenger traffic results.

In addition, the current Mexican federal administration announced that it would seek to alleviate congestion at the existing airport by (i) converting a military airport approximately 40 kilometers (24.9 miles) outside of Mexico City (the “Santa Lucía Airport”) to a civil airport, which is expected to start operations in March 2022, (ii) expanding the Toluca International Airport, which is approximately 60 kilometers (37.3 miles) outside of Mexico City and (iii) expanding the boarding gate capacity at Terminal 2 of the existing Mexico City International Airport, which expansion plan was announced on September 24, 2019. There is still uncertainty about when these renovations will be completed and what impact congestion may have on the existing Mexico City International Airport. We cannot assure you that the airport’s operations will remain at existing levels or increase in the future or that the converted Santa Lucía Airport or expanded Mexico City and Toluca International Airports will start operations on time.

Security enhancements have resulted in increased costs and may require additional investments in the future.

In 2020, 10.7% of the passengers served by our airports were international passengers, of which, 76.8% arrived or departed on flights originating in or departing to the United States. The air travel business is susceptible to increased costs resulting from enhanced security and higher insurance. Following the events of September 11, 2001, we reinforced

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security at our airports, and our general liability insurance premiums increased substantially. For more information on the insurance policies we carry, see “Item 4. Information on the Company – Property, Plant and Equipment.”

Because a substantial majority of our international flights involve travel to and from the United States, we may be required to comply with security directives of the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (“FAA”) in addition to the directives of Mexican aviation authorities. World events, such as the terrorist attacks worldwide attributed to the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria or any other organization, could lead to additional security measures taken by the FAA or the International Civil Aviation Organization (“ICAO”), an agency of the United Nations Organization, and could require us to incur in additional costs to comply with these measures. Similarly, our airport operations and passenger volume could be negatively impacted by terrorist attacks on aircrafts, such as those which occurred with international airlines’ aircraft operating over Egypt and the Ukraine in 2015.

While governments in other countries have agreed to indemnify airlines for liabilities they might incur resulting from terrorist attacks, the Mexican government has not done so and has given no indication of any intention to do the same. In addition, fuel prices and supplies, which constitute a significant cost for airlines using our airports, may be subject to increases resulting from any future terrorist attacks, a general increase in international hostilities or a reduction in output of fuel, voluntary or otherwise, by oil producing countries. Such increases in airlines’ costs have resulted in higher airline ticket prices and decreased demand for air travel generally, thereby having an adverse effect on our revenues and results of operations. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, airlines and airports have had to implement additional security and compliance measures to comply with local health and safety regulations, which could increase costs. We have, among other things, installed disinfectant gel dispensers and air purifiers, mandated facemasks, installed preventive barriers, instituted spacing and flow of movement measures, and provided training to our employees. These enhanced measures have not resulted in a significant increase in our operating costs to date, but we may be required to adopt additional safety measures in the future. Security measures taken to comply with future security directives or in response to a terrorist attack or threat could reduce passenger capacity at our airports due to increased passenger screening and slower security checkpoints and increase our operating costs, which would have an adverse effect on our overall performance.

Furthermore, under the Mexican Airport Law, we are currently responsible for inspecting passengers and their carry-on luggage before they board any aircraft. Under Mexican law, we may be liable to third parties for personal injury or property damage resulting from the performance of such inspection. In addition, we may be required to adopt additional security measures in the future or undertake capital expenditures if security measures for carry-on luggage are enhanced, which could increase our liability or adversely affect our operating results.

The operation of baggage screening equipment could increase our expenses and may expose us to greater liability.

The ICAO’s security guidelines requires checked baggage on all international commercial flights and domestic commercial flights to undergo a comprehensive screening process for the detection of explosives. In some countries, such as the United States, the federal government (in the case of the United States, through the Transportation Security Administration (“TSA”)) is responsible for screening checked baggage. On May 1, 2014 and July 1, 2016, the Mexican Bureau of Civil Aviation (currently the Federal Civil Aviation Agency (Agencia Federal de Aviación Civil or “AFAC”)) published mandatory circulars CO SA-17.2/10 R3 and CO SA-17.9/16, respectively, which require that all airlines screen checked baggage and that all airports have screening equipment that complies with specified guidelines. We have purchased and installed screening equipment in all of our airports to facilitate compliance with the baggage screening guidelines, and our subsidiary, Servicios Complementarios del Centro Norte, S.A. de C.V., has operated the checked baggage screening system since March 1, 2012.

We incur ongoing expenses to maintain and operate this equipment and expect to incur ongoing expenses to maintain any equipment purchased. In the future, we could be required to undertake significant additional capital expenditures for items such as a new screening technology or additional equipment if screening guidelines are expanded further and require that additional steps be taken to comply with the requirements. For instance, replacement of the majority of our baggage screening equipment with new Computer Tomography X-ray (CTX) baggage screening equipment is scheduled for 2021-2025, although regulatory changes could force our airports to undertake this replacement sooner. In addition, the circular CO SA-17.9/16 established that airports must have alternative baggage screening methods in case the inspection technology currently used is no longer available. We believe that we comply

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with the baggage screening guidelines, but AFAC may require additional investments. These additional expenses could restrict our liquidity and adversely affect our results of operations.

Although Mexican law holds airlines liable for screening checked baggage, the purchase, installation and operation of equipment could increase our exposure to liability as a result of our involvement in the screening process.

Competition from other tourist destinations could adversely affect our business.

The principal factor affecting our results of operations and business is the number of passengers using our airports. The number of passengers using our airports (particularly the Acapulco, Mazatlán and Zihuatanejo airports) may vary as a result of factors beyond our control, including the level of tourism in Mexico. In addition, our passenger traffic volume may be adversely affected by the attractiveness, affordability and accessibility of competing tourist destinations in Mexico, such as Cancún, Puerto Vallarta and Los Cabos, or elsewhere, such as Florida, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Jamaica, the Dominican Republic and other Caribbean islands and destinations in Central America.

Tourism levels may decrease, and therefore the number of passengers using our airports in the future may not exceed or match current levels, which could have a direct and indirect impact on our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues.

Our business is highly dependent upon revenues from eight of our thirteen airports and could be adversely impacted by any condition affecting those businesses.

In 2020, approximately 80.6% of the sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues were generated from eight of our thirteen airports. The Monterrey airport generated the most significant portion of our revenues. The following table lists the percentage of the sum of aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues generated at our airports, including the percentage of total revenues generated by our hotel services:

    

For Year Ended

 

Airport

December 31, 2020

 

Monterrey

42.7

%

Culiacán

10.0

%

Chihuahua

6.4

%

Mazatlán

6.0

%

Ciudad Juárez

5.8

%

Acapulco

3.5

%

San Luis Potosí

3.3

%

Zihuatanejo

2.8

%

Five other airports, Servicios Complementarios del Centro Norte, Terminal 2 NH Collection Hotel, and OMA Logística, S.A. de C.V. (“OMA Logística”)(1)

19.4

%

Total

100.0

%


(1)OMA Logística includes revenues from Consorcio Hotelero Aeropuerto Monterrey, S.A.P.I. de C.V. and OMA-VYNMSA Aero Industrial Park, S.A. de C.V.

As a result of the substantial contribution to our revenues from these eight airports, any event or condition affecting these principal airports could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition.

Lastly, we cannot predict any future effect COVID-19 will have on our revenues. For more information on risks related to COVID-19 see “The outbreak of COVID-19 has had, and may continue to have, a negative impact on the global economy and on our business, operations and results.”

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We are dependent on information technology, and our systems and infrastructure face certain risks, including cybersecurity risks.

We rely on a variety of information technology to manage our operations. The proper functioning of these systems is critical to the efficient operation and management of our business. In addition, these systems may require modifications or upgrades as a result of technological changes or growth in our business. These changes may be costly and disruptive to our operations, and could impose substantial demands on management time. Our systems may be vulnerable to damage or disruption caused by circumstances beyond our control, such as catastrophic events, power outages, natural disasters, computer system or network failures, viruses or malware, physical or electronic break-ins, unauthorized access and cyber-attacks. Currently, our information systems are protected with backup systems, including physical and software safeguards located outside of our offices for protection purposes, and a cold site on critical systems to recover information technology operations. Furthermore, we undertake other steps to secure our systems and electronic information from exogenous events. These safety components reduce the risk of disruptions, failures or security breaches of our information technology infrastructure and are reviewed periodically by external advisors. Any such disruption, failure or security breach of our information technology infrastructure, including our back-up systems, could have a negative impact on our operations.

Additionally, the security risks associated with information technology have increased in recent years due to an increase in more complex types of cyber-attacks. A failure of or attack to our information technology systems or those of our contractors could affect our business or result in the disclosure or misuse of confidential or personal information, which could cause significant interruptions in services or other operational difficulties and increases in costs, that could result in losses. Although actions are taken continuously to improve and monitor our information technology systems, these systems remain vulnerable to failures or unauthorized access, which could adversely affect our operations, financial condition and liquidity.

We face risks associated with our diversification activities, which could lead to our inability to recover our investment as planned.

We face risks associated with the nature of the diversification projects that we have developed and in which we participate as shareholders, which could impact our results of operations, prospects and financial condition. Our Terminal 2 NH Collection Hotel and our Hilton Garden Inn Hotel depend on passenger traffic travel to and from the Mexico City International Airport and the Monterrey airport, respectively, and any event that reduces passenger volume in these airports could adversely affect the results of operations of these hotels. The passenger traffic volume in such airports depends on factors beyond our control, such as the attractiveness of the commercial, industrial and tourist centers that the airports serve. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that the passenger traffic volume in such airports will increase or maintain the current level.

As a result of the various measures implemented to control the spread of COVID-19, such as the suspension of non-essential activities and the reduced demand for air travel and hotel services, the operation of our two hotels has experienced significant declines in occupancy rates and in revenues. In 2020, the occupancy rates in our Terminal 2 NH Collection Hotel and our Hilton Garden Inn Hotel in the Monterrey airport were 42.4 and 41.6 percentage points lower, respectively, than in 2019. On April 6, 2020, we temporarily suspended services our Hilton Garden Inn Hotel through July 6, 2020 due to low occupancy demand as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Both of the hotels that we operate, our OMA-VYNMSA industrial park and our OMA Carga bonded warehouses could face additional competition from third parties developing similar projects in areas adjacent to the Monterrey airport. Despite our efforts to retain clients, we cannot predict whether our clients will continue occupying our commercial spaces or cancel their contracts. Furthermore, the continued growth at our OMA-VYNMSA industrial park could also decline should there be a slowdown in the Mexican economy. All such factors could adversely affect the profitability of our non-aeronautical businesses and our ability to recover our investments in such projects.

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Our operations depend on certain key airline customers, and the loss or suspension of operations of one or more of them could result in a loss of a significant amount of our revenues.

Of the total aeronautical revenues generated at our airports in 2020, VivaAerobus represented 28.0%, Volaris represented 23.5%, Aeroméxico and its affiliates represented 20.0% and Interjet represented 5.7 %. None of our contracts with our airline customers obliges them to continue providing service from our airports and, if any of our key customers reduces their use of our airports, competing airlines may not add flights to their schedules to replace any flights no longer handled by our principal airline customers. On June 30, 2020, Aeromexico and its affiliates, which accounted for 20.3% of our total passenger traffic in 2020, filed voluntary Chapter 11 petitions in the United States to implement a financial restructuring while continuing to operate. In addition, as of December 9, 2020, Interjet, which accounted for 5.7% of our total passenger traffic in 2020, stopped operating at our airports due to the financial impact of the current outbreak of COVID-19 on their operations. Our business and results of operations could be adversely affected if we do not continue to generate comparable portions of our revenues from our key customers.

Due to increased competition, volatility in fuel prices and the general decrease in demand because of global volatility in the financial and exchange markets, economic crises and the current COVID-19 related health crisis, many airlines are operating in adverse conditions. Should fuel prices increase or in the event of other adverse health or economic developments, one or more of our principal carriers could become insolvent, cancel routes, suspend operations or file for bankruptcy. All such events could have a material adverse effect on our results from operations. Furthermore, any accident, incident or any other event that affects the perception of safety standards of any of the major airlines may affect their image and generate a public perception that it is less safe or reliable than other airlines. These events would affect consumer demand and the number of passengers serviced by the airline, thus affecting our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition.

The global airline industry has experienced and continues to experience significant financial difficulties and recent warnings regarding industry profitability. In December 2020, the International Air Transport Association, or IATA, issued its 2021 financial forecast for the global commercial airline industry, estimating net post-tax loss of about U.S.$38.7 billion, given that airlines will continue to have difficulty reducing their costs to offset lower revenues. The forecast also indicated that net profit margins were expected to slightly increase to -8.4% in 2021. On February 21, 2021, the IATA announced that it did not expect the airline industry to be cash positive until 2022. The IATA may further reduce its forecasts, and the short-term and long-term effects of the COVID-19 outbreak on the global airline industry is still uncertain. The economic shock from the COVID-19 outbreak, which has been felt more acutely by airlines, has and may continue to trigger insolvencies within the global airline industry.

Some of our airline and other clients and tenants have asked for assistance, either through discounts on payments owed to us or by an extension on those payments. During 2020, we provided payment extensions to our main airline customers, which allowed us to mitigate noncompliance risks. We also offered incentives to our commercial tenants through discounts or payment extensions. No such arrangement materially affected our financial condition or liquidity. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, our reserve for doubtful accounts receivable increased by 231% to Ps.20.8 million as of December 31, 2020, which is mainly comprised of commercial tenants. We cannot assure you whether the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to cause an increase in our reserve for doubtful accounts receivable in 2021. For more information on the impact of COVID-19 on our business, see “The outbreak of COVID-19 has had, and may continue to have, a negative impact on the global economy and on our business, operations and results.”

In addition, Mexican law prohibits an international airline from transporting passengers from one Mexican location to another (unless the flight originated outside Mexico), which limits the number of airlines providing domestic service in Mexico. On December 18, 2015, the United States and Mexico entered into an Air Transport Agreement with the purpose of promoting and facilitating an international aviation system, based on competition among airlines, to facilitate the expansion of international air transport opportunities and ensure the highest degree of safety and security in air transport. The agreement, which replaced the agreement that had been in effect since 1960, became effective as of August 21, 2016, after approval by the Mexican Senate and the competent authorities in the United States. The agreement provides for an increase in services on existing routes between both nations, as well as the addition of new routes and an increase in the frequency of flights on existing routes. The agreement also grants Mexican airlines the ability to further penetrate international markets, as it permits airlines from both countries that operate flights between the United States and Mexico to pick up passengers and continue with the flights to a third country. This agreement may

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be modified in the future to provide for international airlines to operate domestic flights in our airports, but until then we expect to continue to generate a significant portion of our revenues from domestic travel from a limited number of airlines.

Collective labor conflicts in Mexico could have an adverse impact on our results of operations.

A number of events, such as (i) the endorsement by the Mexican Senate of the International Labor Organization’s Convention C098, the “Right to Organize and Collective Bargaining Convention”, (ii) the approval by Congress to modify the Mexican Federal Labor Law, and (iii) the adverse labor effect resulting from the COVID-19 crisis, have led and continue to cause labor conflicts in Mexico.

In addition, such conflicts have been exacerbated by (i) new labor unions created to negotiate and/or dispute existing collective bargaining agreements on behalf of the labor unions that currently hold such contracts, (ii) a 16.21% increase of the general minimum wage nationwide as of January 1, 2019, a subsequent 20.0% increase of the general minimum wage as of January 1, 2020 , and a 15% increase as of January 1, 2021 and (iii) a 100% increase of the minimum wage in the municipalities near the northern border of Mexico on January 1, 2019, an additional 5.0% increase as of January 1, 2020, and a 15% increase as of January 1, 2021. These developments in recent years have led workers and labor unions to demand more significant benefits and higher salary increases than in prior years.

Moreover, the effects of the Mexican government's response to COVID-19, which include travel restrictions, stay-at-home ordinances, restrictions on non-essential activities and other restrictions on the overall operation of businesses across Mexico may strain relationships by and between businesses, on the one hand, and labor unions and/or their employees, on the other. As of the date of this report, the Company has not experienced any material adverse effect as a result of the different labor related developments or those that have resulted from the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic and cannot predict whether these will affect its labor force and relations going forward. For more information on the impact of COVID-19, see “The outbreak of COVID-19 has had, and may continue to have, a negative impact on the global economy and on our business, operations and results.” For more information on employee relations, see “If a change in relations with our labor force should occur, such a change could have an adverse impact on our results of operations” and “Changes to Mexican laws, regulations and decrees applicable to the Company could have a material adverse impact on the results of operations”.

The Company cannot predict how these developments may affect the Company’s results of operations or its financial condition. Any increased demands by the Company’s unionized workers may lead to higher labor costs, which could have a negative impact on its results of operations.

If a change in relations with our labor force should occur, such a change could have an adverse impact on our results of operations.

If any conflicts with our employees were to arise, including with our unionized employees (which accounted for 54.5% of our total employees as of December 31, 2020), resulting events such as strikes or other disruptions that could arise with respect to our workforce could have a negative impact on our results of operations. As of the date of this report, the effects of the COVID-19 outbreak have not affected our relations with our labor force, but we cannot assure you that any further effects resulting from COVID-19 will not cause any disruptions in the future.

Our unionized employees are represented by a national union of airport workers that operates throughout Mexico. To the extent unionized airport workers seek material modifications to the conditions agreed with us and with other Mexican airport operators, our operations could be adversely affected by union activities, including organized strikes or other work stoppages.

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Our operations could be adversely affected due to changes in the collection of passenger charges.

Passenger charges are collected by the airlines and then paid to us on the basis of contracts entered into with each airline operating at our airports. We cannot guarantee that all airlines will continue collecting the passenger charges for us. Should one or more airlines stop collecting passenger charges for us, we would have to collect these charges directly ourselves, which would result in additional costs for us.

Recently, some airlines have reported losses. In cases where we extend days of credit to airlines, substantially all of our revenues from passenger charges and other aeronautical services are secured by a performance bond or other types of guarantees; however, guarantees may not fully cover the amount owed by an airline at a certain date. In the event of the insolvency of any of these airlines, we would not be certain of the collection of any amounts invoiced to that airline in respect of passenger charges. In cases where the airlines cannot provide adequate or sufficient performance bonds or other types of guarantees, the airlines operate under advance payment conditions.

In addition, the COVID-19 outbreak has and will likely continue to adversely affect the global airline industry. For more information on how COVID-19 has affected airlines, see “Our operations depend on certain key airline customers, and the loss or suspension of operations of one or more of them could result in a loss of a significant amount of our revenues.” Given the economic uncertainty for many airlines, it is possible that airlines will stop paying us the applicable passenger charges. Should one or more airlines stop paying us for passengers (other than diplomats, infants, transfer and transit passengers) departing from our terminals, our business and results of operation could be adversely affected. For more information on the impact of COVID-19 on our business, see “The outbreak of COVID-19 has had, and may continue to have, a negative impact on the global economy and on our business, operations and results.”

The main domestic airlines operating at our airports may refuse to pay certain increases in our specific prices for regulated aeronautical services.

In the past, we have entered into a series of agreements with the Mexican National Air Transportation Chamber of Commerce (Cámara Nacional de Aerotransportes) and the Ministry of Communications and Transportation (most recently in January 2013, covering the period from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2015), pursuant to which we established specific prices for regulated aeronautical services applicable to our principal airline customers. Although this agreement has not been renewed as of April 22, 2021, all benefits continue to be provided on the same terms. Furthermore, we have expanded the benefits of the agreement to all domestic and international airlines operating at our airports, even to those airlines that are not affiliated to the Mexican National Air Transportation Chamber of Commerce. Historically, amounts paid under these agreements have not been material, and we do not expect any current agreement or any similar future agreements with the Mexican National Air Transportation Chamber of Commerce or any airline to have a material effect on our results of operations.

Although passenger traffic volume (and therefore overall revenues) may increase, any agreed incentives and/or discounts offered to airlines as a means to prevent or settle any potential dispute could reduce our aeronautical revenues per terminal passenger in the future. In addition, should any of our principal airline customers refuse to continue to make payment to us, or should they refuse to pay increases in our charges for aeronautical services in future years, our results of operations could be adversely impacted by decreased cash flows from operations.

Our operation depends on our management team for its knowledge and experience and the loss of capable executives could affect our operations.

The current and future performance of our operations depends significantly on the continuous contribution of managers and other key employees. In order to achieve the objectives of each manager or key position, the ability, experience, aptitude and knowledge of each candidate is taken into account for recruitment and personnel allocation purposes. We cannot guarantee that in the future our executive team will be maintained, or that if new executives are

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incorporated, they will have the same level of knowledge and experience. The potential lack of a capable management team could adversely affect the operations, financial situation and results of operations.

The operations of our airports may be affected by the actions of third parties, which are beyond our control.

As is the case with most airports, the operation of our airports is largely dependent on the services of third parties, such as air traffic control authorities, airlines, airline providers and ground transportation providers. We also depend upon the Mexican government or government entities for provision of services, such as electricity, supply of fuel to aircraft, air traffic control and immigration and customs services for our international passengers. The disruption or stoppage of taxi or bus services at one or more of our airports could also adversely affect our operations. We are not responsible for and cannot control the services provided by these parties. Any disruption in, or adverse consequence resulting from, their services, including a work stoppage or other similar event, may have a material adverse effect on the operation of our airports and on our results of operations.

In addition, if any service providers were to halt operations at any of our airports, we could be required to seek a new provider of these services or to provide these services ourselves, either of which may result in increased costs and have an adverse impact on our results of operations.

We may be liable for property taxes as a result of claims asserted against us by certain municipalities.

Various municipalities have assessed tax credits against us for the payment of property taxes with respect to the real estate on which we operate our airports in those cities. We have appealed all the administrative law proceedings, as well as the tax credits, assessed against us and, while some have been dismissed by the relevant administrative authority, some are still pending. We believe there are no legal grounds which enable the municipalities to collect such taxes and although we intend to defend our position vigorously, if procedures are brought by authorities, there can be no assurance that we will be successful in such defense. See “Item 8. Financial Information—Legal Proceedings—Property Tax Claims” for a full discussion of these property tax proceedings. Some Mexican airport operators contesting the assessment of similar property tax claims have been required to post material surety bonds in connection with their challenge of those assessments. If we are required to post similar surety bonds in the future, the terms of the surety bonds may restrict our ability to pay dividends or otherwise limit our flexibility. In addition, if we are required to pay for additional state or municipal rights, we could face costs, limiting our liquidity, flexibility and ability to pay dividends.

Furthermore, if the Mexican government changes the current laws or if we do not prevail in these proceedings, these tax liabilities could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. In addition, any change in law which enables municipalities to request construction or operation permits may affect our ability to comply with investments required under our Master Development Programs, which in turn may result in additional payments for governmental tariffs and affect our results of operations.

Inability to generate sufficient future taxable profits or adverse changes to tax laws, regulatory requirements or accounting standards could have a negative impact on the recoverability of certain deferred tax assets.

We recognize deferred tax assets relating to tax losses carried forward and deductible temporary differences only to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profit will be available against which the tax losses carried forward and the temporary differences can be utilized. Net deferred tax assets amounted to approximately Ps.183,930 thousand at December 31, 2020. The deferred tax assets are quantified on the basis of currently enacted tax rates and accounting standards and are subject to change as a result of future changes to tax laws or the rules for computing taxable profits and allowable losses. Failure to generate sufficient future taxable profits or changes in tax laws or accounting standards may reduce our estimated recoverable amount of net deferred tax assets. Such a reduction could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. For further information on deferred tax assets, refer to Note 4.p. to our audited consolidated financial statements. See “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects—Critical Accounting Policies—Deferred Income Taxes.”

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Natural disasters could adversely affect our business.

From time to time, the northern and central regions of Mexico experience torrential rains, hurricanes (particularly during the months of July through September) and, depending on the region, earthquakes and volcanic activity. In addition, the Mazatlán, Culiacán and Acapulco airports are susceptible to occasional flooding due to torrential rainfall.

Natural disasters may impede or cause the suspension of operations, damage infrastructure necessary to our operations or adversely affect the destinations served by our airports. For instance, on November 3, 2016, the Tampico airport flooded due to heavy rains, causing the collapse of part of the bordering fence. Although, the affected neighbors filed claims for damages against the Tampico airport, the insurance carrier rejected the neighbors’ claims alleging that the damage was caused by a natural disaster. In addition, the Terminal 2 NH Collection Hotel located in Terminal 2 of the Mexico City International Airport was temporarily closed after the earthquake on September 19, 2017. Although the Terminal 2 NH Collection Hotel did not suffer any structural damage, utilities of the hotel were interrupted and hotel operations were suspended until September 25, 2017.

Any of these events could reduce our passenger and cargo traffic volume in the airports and our guest volume in the Terminal 2 NH Collection Hotel. For example, our international passenger traffic decreased 1.2% during September 2017, partially due to the cancellation of flights caused by hurricanes Harvey and Max. The occurrence of natural disasters in the destinations that we serve could adversely affect our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition.

We have insurance for the physical facilities at our airports against damage caused by natural disasters, accidents or other similar events, but we do not have insurance covering losses due to resulting business interruption. Moreover, should losses occur, losses caused by damages to the physical facilities may exceed the pre-established limits on any of our insurance policies.

Our operations are at greater risk of disruption due to the dependence of several of our airports on a single commercial runway.

As is the case with many other domestic and international airports around the world, several of our airports, including the Monterrey, Culiacán, Ciudad Juárez and Mazatlán airports, have only one runway for most commercial flights. The operation of our runways may be disrupted due to required maintenance or repairs. In addition, our runways may require unscheduled repair or maintenance due to natural disasters, aircraft accidents and other factors that are beyond our control. The closure of any runway for a significant period of time could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition.

We are exposed to risk related to construction projects.

The building requirements under our Master Development Programs could encounter delays or cause us to exceed our budgeted costs for such projects, which could limit our ability to expand capacity at our airports, increase our operating or capital expenditures and could adversely affect our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition. Such delays or budgetary overruns also could limit our ability to comply with our Master Development Programs, which are established as a necessary requirement to our concessions.

From March 31, 2020 to June 1, 2020, we stopped most construction works, including those needed to comply with our Master Development Program, as a result of the restrictions imposed by the Mexican government on non-essential activity, including construction, in Mexico due to the COVID-19 outbreak. These restrictions generated delays in our scheduled works to comply with our Master Development Program commitments for 2020. Even though the delays were notified to and agreed upon with the regulator, should we experience any other delay that prevents us from complying with our Master Development Program commitments, there could be penalties which could adversely affect our business, results of operations, prospect and financial condition.

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We are exposed to certain risks inherently associated with the rental of real property.

We are exposed to risks generally associated with properties rented to third parties, such as a decline in rental market demand, occupancy rates or rent levels, non-payment of minimum rent and royalties by tenants or a weakening of the real estate market. Moreover, our real estate assets are located on or adjacent to our airports and serve a particular sector of the rental market, thus exposing us to fluctuations in this specific market. Any of these risks could adversely affect the profitability of our real estate development activities and, consequently, our business, results of operations, prospects and financial position.

We are exposed to the risk of non-performance by our subcontractors.

We subcontract certain services (including security and surveillance services) necessary to conduct our operations. In the event that our subcontractors fail to perform their obligations under our agreements, we could incur extra costs in providing replacements and could be exposed to liability for operations that we may have to provide directly, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition.

In accordance with applicable labor laws, subcontractors are required to register their employees with the Mexican Social Security Institute (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social), and anyone employing the services of subcontractors that has failed to comply with these laws is jointly liable for the payment of social security obligations as well as any applicable penalties. Therefore, if subcontractors providing services at our airports do not have their employees registered at the Mexican Social Security Institute, we could be held jointly liable for the payment of social security obligations that such contractors may have, as well as any applicable penalties.

Our ability to expand certain of our airports and to comply with applicable safety guidelines could be limited by difficulties we encounter in acquiring additional land on which to operate our airports.

Certain guidelines established by the ICAO require the maintenance of a perimeter surrounding the land used for airport operations. At several of our airports, we do not control portions of the land within the required perimeters. If portions of such land adjacent to certain of our airports are developed by third parties in a manner that encroaches on the required perimeters, our ability to comply with applicable guidelines of the ICAO or to expand our airport operations could be adversely affected. Also, the growth of certain cities in the proximity of our airports could limit our ability to expand our airports.

To allow the future expansion of the Monterrey airport, including the construction of a second commercial runway and the relocation of the control tower, in February and June 2007, March and May 2008, July and December 2009 and February, July and December 2010, we completed acquisitions of land surrounding the airport with an aggregate area of 777 hectares (3 square miles), for an aggregate price of Ps.1,559,381 thousand (U.S.$121.3 million). Improvements made to airport facilities at our expense may be recognized by AFAC as part of our investment in the airport concession. We received authorization from AFAC to reallocate Ps.386,538 thousand (amount expressed in nominal 2009 pesos) of our investment in this land to investments included in the 2011–2015 Master Development Program for the Monterrey airport. The recovery of the remaining investment of Ps.695,759 thousand (amount expressed in nominal 2009 pesos), is included in the indicative period of our current approved Master Development Program for 2026-2035. The remaining amount of the investments may not be recognized by the Ministry of Communications and Transportation in the future.

Our future profitability and growth will depend upon our ability to expand our airports in the future. Potential limitations on our possibility of expansion, such as those described above, could restrict any such expansion and thus have a material adverse effect on the future profitability and growth of our business.

We are exposed to risks inherent to the operation of airports.

We are obligated to protect the public at our airports and to reduce the risk of accidents at our airports. As with any company dealing with members of the public, we must implement certain measures for the protection of the public, such as fire safety in public spaces, design and maintenance of car parking facilities and access routes to meet road safety rules. We are also obligated to take certain measures related to aviation activities, such as maintenance,

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management and supervision of aviation facilities, rescue and fire-fighting services for aircraft, measurement of runway friction coefficients, flood control at the Acapulco airport and measures to control the threat from birds and other wildlife on airport sites. These obligations may require us to incur additional costs and could increase our exposure to liability to third parties for personal injury or property damage resulting from our operations.

Our insurance policies may not provide sufficient coverage against all liabilities.

While we seek to insure all reasonable risks, our insurance policies may not cover all of our liabilities in the event of an accident, terrorist attack or any other incident. The markets for airport insurance and construction insurance are limited, and a change in coverage policy by the insurance companies involved could reduce our ability to obtain and maintain adequate or cost-effective coverage. A certain number of our assets cannot, by their nature, be covered by property insurance (notably aircraft movement areas, and certain civil engineering works and infrastructure). In addition, we do not currently carry business-interruption insurance.

We are exposed to risks related to handling cargo.

The air cargo system is a complex, multi-faceted network that handles a vast amount of freight, packages and mail carried aboard passenger and all-cargo aircraft. The air cargo system is vulnerable to several security threats, including: potential plots to place explosives aboard aircraft; illegal shipments of hazardous materials; criminal activities, such as smuggling and theft; and potential hijackings and sabotage by persons with access to aircraft. Several procedural and technology initiatives to enhance air cargo security and detect terrorist and criminal threats have been put in place, such as an x-ray machine certified by the TSA in the bonded OMA Carga area at the Monterrey airport, or are under consideration.

We may be subject to risks related to the integrity of our facilities or the reduction of our cargo traffic volume. The occurrence of such events could adversely affect our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition.

We may not be able to detect money laundering operations and other illegal or improper activities, which could expose us to additional liabilities and adversely affect our operations and financial results.

We are required to comply with applicable anti-money laundering and anti-terrorism and other regulations in Mexico. Such laws require us to adopt and implement certain policies and procedures designed to detect and prevent transactions with third parties involved in money laundering or terrorist activities. Although we have adopted such policies and procedures, these procedures require services related to third parties that are not under our control, including third-party providers of complementary services or retailers, restaurants and other commercial tenants leasing spaces at the airport. To the extent that we may fail to fully comply with applicable laws and regulations or fail to detect illegal activities carried out by third parties, the competent authorities may impose certain fines on us and our reputation may also be adversely affected.

We could be exposed to additional risks if we pursue business opportunities in other countries.

From time to time, we may consider strategic participation in airport assets located in other countries. We may evaluate international expansion opportunities through capital investment in other concessions. Expansion into a market outside of Mexico could require significant capital expenditures. If we pursue an international expansion opportunity, we could face internal or external risks, including, without limitation: (i) a lack of market experience in the relevant country, (ii) foreign exchange and economic volatility, (iii) the dedication of significant management resources to execute the international operation and (iv) exposure to risks inherent to doing business in the relevant country. Our inability to successfully manage the risks and uncertainties related to such business opportunities could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition, including our capital structure.  

Discontinuation, reform or replacement of the London Interbank Offered Rate (or LIBOR) or other benchmark interest rates, or uncertainty related to the potential for any of the foregoing, may impact our business.

As of December 31, 2020, we had Ps. 13,503 thousand (U.S. $678,246 ) of variable rate indebtedness linked to LIBOR or other benchmark rates.  In July 2017, the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates LIBOR,

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announced its intention to phase out the use of LIBOR by the end of 2023.  In addition, other regulators have suggested reforming or replacing other benchmark rates including peso-denominated rates.  As there is not yet definitive information regarding the phase-out of LIBOR, we cannot currently predict the effect of the discontinuation, reform or replacement of LIBOR.  However, the phase out of LIBOR and the discontinuation, reform or replacement of other benchmark rates may have an unpredictable impact on, or cause disruption to, the broader financial markets or borrowing costs to borrowers.  These developments may in turn increase the cost of our variable rate indebtedness or otherwise have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Risks Related to the Regulation of Our Business

The Company provides a public service regulated by the Mexican government, and the flexibility in managing aeronautical activities is limited by the regulatory environment in which the Company operates.

The Company’s aeronautical fees charged to airlines and passengers are regulated, like most airports in other countries. In 2018, 2019 and 2020, approximately 65.0%. 67.5% and 54.8%, respectively, of the Company’s total revenues, and approximately 76.0%, 76.0% and 71.5%, respectively, of the sum of its aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues were earned from aeronautical services, which are subject to price regulation under the Company’s maximum rates. These regulations may limit the Company’s flexibility in operating its aeronautical activities, which could have a material adverse effect on its business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition. In addition, several of the regulations applicable to the Company’s operations that affect its profitability are authorized (as in the case of the Master Development Programs) or established (as in the case of maximum rates) by the Ministry of Communications and Transportation for five-year terms. The Company generally does not have the ability to unilaterally change its obligations (such as the investment obligations under its Master Development Programs or the obligation under its concessions to provide a public service) or increase our maximum rates applicable under those regulations should the passenger traffic or other assumptions on which the regulations were based change during the applicable term. In addition, this price regulation system may be amended in the future in a manner that would cause additional sources of the Company’s revenues to be regulated.

The Company’s results of operations may be adversely affected by required efficiency adjustments to its maximum rates.

The Company’s maximum rates in Mexico are subject to annual efficiency adjustments, which have the effect of reducing the maximum rates for each year to reflect projected efficiency improvements. For the five year period ending December 31, 2020 and December 31, 2025, the maximum rates applicable to the Company’s airports reflect an annual efficiency improvement of 0.70%. Future annual efficiency adjustments will be determined by the Ministry of Communications and Transportation in connection with the setting of each Mexican airport’s maximum rates every five years. For a description of these efficiency adjustments, see “Item 4. Information on the Company—Regulatory Framework—Revenue Regulation—Methodology for Determining Future Maximum Rates.” We cannot provide assurance that we will achieve efficiency improvements sufficient to maintain or increase our operating income as a result of the progressive decrease in each of our airport’s maximum rate.

The Company cannot predict how the regulations governing the business will be applied.

Many of the laws, regulations and instruments that regulate the Company’s business were adopted or became effective in 1999, and there is only a limited history and examples that would allow the Company to predict the impact of these legal requirements on its future operations. Mexican law establishes ranges of sanctions that might be imposed should the Company fail to comply with the terms of one of its concessions, the Mexican Airport Law and its regulations or other applicable laws. The Company cannot predict the sanctions that are likely to be assessed for a given violation within these ranges. It may encounter difficulties in complying with these laws, regulations and instruments.

Although the Master Development Programs and maximum rates through 2025 have been set, the Company cannot predict what the Master Development Program for 2026 and following years will establish. When determining the maximum rates for the next five year period (from 2026 to 2030), the Ministry of Communications and Transportation may be solicited by different entities (for example, the Antitrust Commission) and the carriers operating at our airports) to modify the maximum rates, thus reducing the Company’s profitability. The laws and regulations governing the business, including the rate-setting process and the Mexican Airport Law, may change in the future or be

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applied or interpreted in a way that could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition.

Additionally, on October 16, 2019, the Ministry of Communications and Transportation established AFAC, an independent regulatory agency, that replaced the Mexican Bureau of Civil Aviation (Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil). AFAC is responsible for establishing, coordinating, overseeing and controlling international and national air transportation, as well as the airports, complementary services and generally all activities related to civil aviation. Even though AFAC has been formally established, its internal regulations and operation manuals are still pending as of the date of this report. As such, the Company cannot predict how this new agency will be organized, the scope of its authority, the actions that it will take in the future or the effect of any such actions on its business.

On February 20, 2014, a bill of the new Federal Antitrust Law (Ley Federal de Competencia Económica) was submitted to Mexico’s Congress in furtherance and as a result of certain amendments to Mexico’s Constitution passed in 2013. The bill was enacted and published on May 23, 2014. The law grants broader powers to the Antitrust Commission, including the authority to regulate essential facilities, order the divestment of assets and eliminate barriers to competition in order to promote access to the market. Such law also sets forth important changes in connection with mergers and anti-competitive behavior, increases liabilities and the amount of fines that may be imposed for violations of the law and limits the availability of legal defenses against the application of the law. The Antitrust Commission may therefore determine that the services that the Company provides at its airports are essential and require it to implement significant changes to its business operations and thus generate a significant impact on its results of operations.

For example, pursuant to the Federal Antitrust Law (Ley Federal de Competencia Económica), the Antitrust Commission determined that the slots allocated to air carriers at the Mexico City International Airport constitute an essential service. The Antitrust Commission found that the allocation of slots led to flight delays and cancellations and, among others, hindered entry to new competitors. On July 3, 2017, the Antitrust Commission issued a series of corrective measures (the “Corrective Measures”) for the Mexico City International Airport to address the inefficiencies and anticompetitive effects observed at such airport.

In response to the Antitrust Commission’s findings, the Ministry of Communications and Transportation (Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes) published an amendment to the regulations of the Mexican Airport Law in the Federal Official Gazette on September 29, 2017, as well as general guidelines for the allocation of slots at congested airports (the “General Guidelines”). The Antitrust Commission found that the reforms issued by the Ministry of Communications and Transportation did not provide a solution to the issues the Antitrust Commission had addressed and that the General Guidelines directly contradicted the Corrective Measures. As a result, the Antitrust Commission filed an appeal (controversia constitucional) before the Mexican Supreme Court, arguing that the Antitrust Commission, not the Ministry of Communications and Transportation, has the authority to regulate the allocation of slots as a public essential service. On November 26, 2019 the Mexican Supreme Court ruled against the Antitrust Commission.

Even though none of its airports have been declared congested as of the date of this report, the Company cannot predict whether or when this will happen. Similarly, it cannot predict whether the Antitrust Commission will declare any of its airports, or any complementary or commercial service provided at the airports, as essential services, and consequently, establish rules, recommendations, guidelines or conditions that could limit or restrict the Company’s aeronautical and/or non-aeronautical revenues.

The regulations pursuant to which the maximum rates applicable to the aeronautical revenues are established do not guarantee that the consolidated results of operations, or the results of operations of any airport, will be profitable, or that the Company will realize the expected return on investment.

The regulations applicable to the Company’s aeronautical activities establish an annual maximum rate for each airport, which is the maximum annual amount of revenues per workload unit (which is equal to one terminal passenger or 100 kilograms (220 pounds) of cargo) that the Company may earn at that airport from services subject to price regulation. For a discussion of the framework for establishing its maximum rates and the application of the rates, see “Item 4. Information on the Company—Regulatory Framework—Revenue Regulation.” On November 30, 2020, the Ministry of Communications and Transportation approved, based on the terms of the Company’s concessions, the

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maximum rates for its airports from January 1, 2021 through December 31, 2025. Under the terms of the Company’s concessions, there is no guarantee that the results of operations of any airport will be profitable. The Company may not realize its expected return on investment from investments under the Master Development Programs.

The Company’s concessions provide that an airport’s maximum rates will be adjusted periodically for inflation (determined by reference to the Mexican Producer Price Index (Índice Nacional de Precios Productor), excluding fuel). Although the Company is entitled to request additional adjustments to an airport’s maximum rates under certain circumstances including, among others, required capital investments not foreseen in the Master Development Programs, decreases in capital investments attributable to Mexican economy-related passenger traffic decreases or modifications of the concession tax payable by the Company, its concessions provide that such a request will be approved only if the Ministry of Communications and Transportation determines that certain limited events specified in the concessions have occurred. Therefore, such a request may not be granted in the future. If a request to increase an airport’s maximum rates is not granted, and the Company is impacted by the circumstances that led to the request, its results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected, and the value of Series B shares and ADSs could decline.

The Company business is dependent upon international regulations that affect Mexican airlines.

The FAA evaluates the legal framework for civil aviation and issues related to the monitoring, staff training and inspection processes related to regulations issued by the ICAO.

On July 30, 2010, the FAA downgraded Mexico’s aviation safety rating from an ICAO Category 1 rating to an ICAO Category 2 rating, as a result of the FAA’s visit to the Mexican Bureau of Civil Aviation (currently AFAC) between January and July 2010. The downgrade was attributable to an insufficient number of flight inspectors and administrative and organizational elements in the Mexican Bureau of Civil Aviation (currently AFAC).

The consequences of the downgrade from a Category 1 rating to a Category 2 rating were the suspension of the right to operate code-shared flights and the restriction of Mexican airlines’ ability to increase the frequency of, or add new routes to, the United States and that the international routes of Mexicana de Aviación would not be flown by any Mexican carrier with a Category 2 rating.

Mexico regained its Category 1 safety rating on December 1, 2010; however, Mexico may be downgraded in the future, and the Company cannot be certain of how long this Category 1 rating will be maintained. We cannot predict what impact such a downgrade would have on our passenger traffic or results of operations, or on the public perception of the safety of our airports.

If the Company exceeds the maximum rate at any airport at the end of any year, it could be subject to sanctions.

Historically, the Company has set the tariffs it charges for aeronautical services at each airport in order to come as close as possible to its authorized maximum rate for that airport in any given year. For example, in 2020, the revenues subject to maximum rate regulation represented approximately 99.3% of the amounts the Company was entitled to earn under the maximum rates for all of its airports. The Company may not be able to establish tariffs in the future that allows it to collect substantially all of the revenues it is entitled to earn from services subject to price regulation.

The specific tariffs the Company charges for aeronautical services are determined based on various factors, including projections of passenger traffic volumes, the Mexican Producer Price Index (excluding fuel), the Mexican Consumer Price Index and the value of the peso relative to the U.S. dollar. These variables are outside of the Company’s control. The Company’s projections could differ from the applicable actual data, and, if these differences occur at the end of any year, they could cause the Company to exceed the maximum rate at any one or more of its airports during that year.

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If the Company exceeds the maximum rate at any airport at the end of any year, the Ministry of Communications and Transportation may assess a fine and may reduce the maximum rate at that airport in the subsequent year. The imposition of sanctions for violations of certain terms of a concession, including for exceeding an airport’s maximum rate, can result in termination of the concession if the relevant term has been violated and sanctions have been imposed at least three times. In the event that any one of the Company’s concessions is terminated, its other concessions may also be terminated. For a discussion of events that may lead to a termination of a concession, see “Item 4. Information on the Company—Regulatory Framework—Penalties and Termination and Revocation of Concessions and Concession Assets.”

Depreciation of the peso may cause the Company to exceed the maximum rates.

The Company aims to charge prices that are as close as possible to its maximum chargeable rates, and it is entitled to adjust the specific tariffs only once every six months for inflation (or earlier upon a cumulative increase of 5% in the Mexican Producer Price Index (excluding fuel)). However, the Company generally collects passenger charges from airlines 30 to 60 days following the date of each flight. The tariffs for the services that it provides to international flights or international passengers are generally denominated in U.S. dollars but are paid in Mexican pesos based on the average exchange rate for the month prior to each flight. Accordingly, depreciation of the peso, particularly late in the year, could cause the Company to exceed the maximum rates at one or more of its airports, which could lead to the imposition of fines and the subsequent termination of one or more of its concessions.

The peso has historically experienced significant volatility. From December 31, 2018 to December 31, 2019, the peso appreciated by approximately 3.9%, from Ps.19.64 per U.S.$1.00 on December 31, 2018 to Ps.18.86 per U.S.$1.00 on December 31, 2019. From December 31, 2019 to December 31, 2020, the peso depreciated by approximately 5.5%, from Ps.18.86 per U.S.$1.00 on December 31, 2019 to Ps.19.89 per U.S.$1.00 on December 31, 2020. On April 22, 2021, the exchange rate was Ps.19.87 per U.S.$1.00.

The Mexican government may terminate or reacquire the concessions under various circumstances, some of which are beyond the control of the Company.

The Company’s concessions are its principal assets, and it would be unable to continue operations without them. A concession may be revoked by the Mexican government for certain prescribed reasons, including the failure to comply with the Master Development Programs, a temporary or permanent halt in the Company’s operations, actions affecting the operations of other concession holders in Mexico, the failure to pay damages resulting from its operations, the failure to keep the rates from exceeding its maximum rates or the failure to comply with any other material term of its concessions. Violations of certain terms of a concession (including violations for exceeding the applicable maximum rate) can result in revocation of a concession only if sanctions have been imposed for violations of the relevant term at least three times. Violations of other terms of a concession can result in the immediate termination of the concession. The concessions may also be terminated upon the Company’s bankruptcy or insolvency. Violations of the Mexican Airport Law, its regulations or other federal regulations could result in similar sanctions. In the event that any one of the Company’s concessions is terminated, its other concessions may also be terminated. For a discussion of events that may lead to a termination of a concession, see “Item 4. Information on the Company—Regulatory Framework—Penalties and Termination and Revocation of Concessions and Concession Assets.”

Under applicable Mexican law and the terms of the Company’s concessions, its concessions may also be made subject to additional conditions, including under the renewed Master Development Programs, which the Company may be unable to meet. Failure to meet these conditions may also result in fines, other sanctions and the termination of the concessions.

The Mexican government may also terminate one or more of the concessions at any time through reversion, if, in accordance with applicable Mexican law, it determines that it is in the public interest to do so. The Mexican government may also assume the operation of any airport in the event of war, public disturbance or a threat to national security. In addition, in the case of a force majeure event, the Mexican government may require the Company to implement certain changes in its operations. In the event of a reversion of the public domain assets that are the subject of the concessions, the Mexican government under Mexican law is required to compensate the Company for the value of the concessions or added costs based on the results of an audit performed by appraisers or, in the case of a mandated

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change in the Company’s operations, the cost of that change. Similarly, in the event of an assumption of the Company’s operations, other than in the event of war, the government is required to compensate it and any other affected parties for any resulting damages. The Company may not receive compensation equivalent to the value of its investment in or any additional damages related to its concessions and related assets in the event of such action.

In the event that any one of the Company’s concessions is terminated, whether through revocation or otherwise, its other concessions may also be terminated. Thus, the loss of any concession would have a material adverse effect on the business and results of operations.

The Mexican government could grant new concessions that compete with the airports operated by the Company.

The Mexican government could grant additional concessions to operate existing government-managed airports or authorize the construction of new airports, which could compete directly with the airports operated by the Company.

On February 5, 2014, the Mexican government announced in the Federal Official Gazette that the Ministry of Communications and Transportation granted to Administradora de Servicios Aeroportuarios de Chihuahua, S.A. de C.V., a concession for 20 years to construct, operate and exploit a civil-aviation airport in the municipality of Bocoyna, Chihuahua, located 250 kilometers (144 miles) from the city of Chihuahua, within an area of 95.5 hectares (0.4 square miles). The government of the state of Chihuahua owns 98% of the capital stock of Administradora de Servicios Aeroportuarios de Chihuahua, S.A. de C.V. The airport has an ICAO Category 3C rating and could present competition to the Company’s airport located in the municipality of Chihuahua, which has a higher ICAO Category 4D rating and is located 18 kilometers (11.2 miles) from the city of Chihuahua. The Ministry of Communications and Transportation has the capacity to upgrade the category of the airport depending on improvements to infrastructure made by the concessionaire or could downgrade the category if the concessionaire does not maintain adequate conditions in the airport. On February 21, 2020, the State of Chihuahua announced that the airport was expected to start operations in late 2020, with limited operations through late 2021. On January 15, 2021, the State of Chihuahua mentioned that the airport is expected to start operations in late 2021, due to constructions delays because of COVID-19. The airport is expected to be fully operational beginning in 2022 and will serve both commercial and general aviation flights. It will have an annual capacity to serve up to 450,000 passengers. As of the date of this report, the Company cannot predict whether the Chihuahua airport will materially affect its results of operations or financial performance.

In the future, the Company may face competition from Aeropuerto del Norte, an airport near Monterrey operated by a third party pursuant to a concession. Historically, Aeropuerto del Norte has been used solely for general aviation operations. The state of Nuevo León has requested in the past that the Ministry of Communications and Transportation amend Aeropuerto del Norte’s concession to allow it to serve commercial aviation operations. To date, the Ministry of Communications and Transportation has not amended Aeropuerto del Norte’s concession. However, the Ministry of Communications and Transportation may authorize such an amendment and commercial aviation flights may operate from Aeropuerto del Norte in the future. Any competition from other such airports could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition. Under certain circumstances, the grant of a concession for a new or existing airport must be made pursuant to a public bidding process. In the event that a competing concession is offered in a public bidding process, the Company may not participate in such a process, or it may not be successful if it were to participate. See “Item 4. Information on the Company—Regulatory Framework—Grants of New Concessions.”

The Ministry of Communications and Transportation could require the Company to monitor certain aircraft movements at its airports that the Company does not currently control, which could result in increased costs.

The Mexican Air Traffic Control Authority (Servicios a la Navegación en el Espacio Aéreo Mexicano) or “SENEAM”, could require the Company to monitor certain aircraft movements at its airports that the Company does not currently control, which could result in increased costs. SENEAM may require the Company to manage and control aircraft movements in and out of its arrival and departure gates and remote boarding locations at its airports. Should SENEAM require the Company to control, or if the Company, for efficiency purposes, requests to control, these aircraft movements directly at any or all of its other airports in the future, the Company’s results of operations could be negatively impacted by increased operating insurance and liability costs resulting from taking on these obligations.

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Changes to Mexican laws, regulations and decrees applicable to the Company could have a material adverse impact on the results of operations.

In recent years, the Mexican government has implemented changes to the tax laws applicable to Mexican companies, including the Company. The terms of the Company’s concessions do not exempt it from any changes to the Mexican tax laws. Should the Mexican government implement changes to the tax laws that result in the Company having significantly higher income tax, the Company will be required to pay higher amounts due pursuant to any such changes, which could have a material adverse impact on its results of operations. For example, the issuance of the Business Flat Tax (Impuesto Empresarial a Tasa Única), which was published on October 1, 2007 and repealed in 2013, adversely impacted the Company’s results of operations in each of the years from 2007 through 2013. In addition, changes to the Mexican constitution or to any other Mexican laws could also have a material adverse impact on the Company’s business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition.

On December 27, 2016, the Ministry of Finance and Public Credit announced an increase, effective January 1, 2017, in the maximum gasoline and diesel prices to be applied in certain regions of Mexico, which caused an increase of gasoline prices of up to 20% in those areas. Furthermore, in November 2017, the Mexican Government removed price controls on gasoline and diesel. The removal of price controls and the resulting price increases led to widespread protests across Mexico. The Company cannot predict the effect of changes in gasoline and diesel prices, and any related political and social unrest, on the Mexican economy or whether the Mexican Government may alter its strategy for price liberalization in the future.

On May 1, 2019, the Mexican Government published significant reforms in the Federal Official Gazette to the Mexican Federal Labor Law. These changes include the creation of courts specializing in labor law and protections to the collective rights of workers and union rights. As a result of these reforms, employees cannot be forced to join a union and more than one union can exist in every workplace. Currently, all unionized Company employees are represented by a national union of airport workers that operates throughout Mexico. To the extent unionized airport workers seek to create or join new unions, and/or materially modify the conditions agreed with the Company and with other Mexican airport operators, the Company’s operations could be adversely affected by union activities, including organized strikes or other work stoppages. The Company cannot predict how these developments may affect the Company’s results of operations or its financial condition. Any increased demands by the Company’s unionized workers may lead to higher labor costs, which could have a negative impact on its results of operations. For more information, see “Collective labor conflicts in Mexico could have an adverse impact on our results of operations” and “If a change in relations with our labor force should occur, such a change could have an adverse impact on our results of operations.”

In December 2019, the Mexican government published several amendments to the Income Tax Law, Value Added Tax Law, Excise Tax Law and the Federal Tax Code, most of which became effective on January 1, 2020. This set of tax reforms is one of the most important in the past few years and its main purpose is to tackle tax evasion by strengthening tax authorities’ control mechanisms. These amendments imposed stringent restrictions on the deductibility of certain expenses, such as a new earnings-stripping rule applicable to net interest, and the non-deductibility of payments to related parties that are deemed subject to preferential tax regimes or by means of structured arrangements, introduced regulations regarding hybrid mismatches and added amendments to the tax treatment applicable to tax transparent foreign entities or arrangements, all of which could affect our operating results. None of these amendments significantly impacted our operating results in 2020.

The 2020 tax reform also introduced a new mandatory disclosure regime aimed at tax advisors, for purposes of reporting and monitoring specific tax schemes listed under article 199 of the Federal Tax Code.

On April 23, 2021, the Mexican government published a decree pursuant to which several amendments were made to the Federal Labor Law, Income Tax Law, VAT Law, among others, in order to prohibit outsourcing of personnel. The amendments became effective April 24, 2021, except for certain legal provisions that will become effective August 1, 2021. Among the most important amendments made are: (i) prohibition of outsourcing of personnel, which consists of an individual or legal entity providing or making available its own workers for the benefit of another, including those provided by companies within the same business group; (ii) the provision of specialized services or the execution of specialized works (through external providers or companies within the same business group), is still allowed, only to the extent the services provided are not part of the corporate purpose or the primary economic activity

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of the company receiving the services; (iii) companies that hire specialized services with a contractor who fails to comply with its labor obligations will be jointly and severally liable with such contractor; (iv) companies that provide specialized services will require to be registered with the Ministry of Labor and Social Welfare (STPS); (v) violation of the new rules will result in fines ranging from 2,000 to 50,000 UMAs (approximately between U.S.$9,003 to U.S.$225,077); and (vi) payments to subcontracting personnel will not have tax effects of income tax deduction or VAT accreditation; furthermore, irregularities will be prosecuted as a tax fraud offense. The Company is analyzing the effect that the amendments will have on its costs, which could have a negative impact on its results of operations.

On January 11, 2021, the Mexican Government published reforms to Article 311 of Mexican Federal Labor Law in the Federal Official Gazette, regulating remote working conditions. As a result of these reforms, employees that work more than 40% of their work hours from home or from any other place that is not the applicable company’s domicile without supervision or guidance from the employer have new rights and obligations. These new rules also sets forth new obligations for employers. For example, employers must now provide the necessary tools and services for employees to fulfill their jobs. This reform became effective as of January 12, 2021 and provides for the publication of a Mexican Official Norm (Norma Oficial Mexicana, or “NOM”) which will determine the conditions to be complied with by employers to protect the security and health of employees working under this modality. These developments may adversely affect the Company’s results of operations or financial condition.

On March 10, 2021, a decree amending certain terms of the Electric Industry Law (EIL) became effective. The amendments aim to strengthen the state-owned utility Comisión Federal de Electricidad (CFE). The amendment includes, among others, (a) modifications to the order of priority of dispatch to the national electric grid; (b) modifications to the granting of permits referred in the EIL, which will now be subject to the planning criteria issued by the Ministry of Energy; and (c) powers granted to the Energy Regulatory Commission (“CRE”, for its acronym in Spanish) to revoke vesting self-supply contracts. The Company entered in 2017 into a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a wind electricity generator, which expires in 2028. In 2020, approximately 78% of the total electricity consumption of the Company was supplied under this agreement. As of the date of this memorandum, we cannot predict how these amendments to the EIL will affect the PPA.

In addition, as part of the current Federal Administration’s effort to protect worker’s rights, on October 23, 2019, NOM-035-STPS-2018 became effective. This NOM seeks to identify and prevent psychosocial risk factors in the workplace and promote a favorable work environment. Some of the obligations set forth in this NOM include the creation of internal policies to prevent psychosocial risks, such as workloads, excessive work hours and shift rotations, negative interference in family life, negative leaderships in the workplace and violence in the workplace. While the Company has complied with the NOM provisions, the Company cannot predict whether its employees will eventually claim that the Company violated any of the provisions under the NOM. Any claims against the Company filed by its employees may lead to higher labor costs, which could have a negative impact on our results of operations. For more information, see “If a change in relations with our labor force should occur, such a change could have an adverse impact on our results of operations.”

Risks Related to Mexico

The Company’s business is significantly dependent upon the volume of air passenger traffic in Mexico, and negative economic developments in Mexico could adversely affect its business and results of operations.

In 2018, 2019 and 2020, domestic terminal passengers have represented approximately 88.2%, 88.1% and 89.3%, respectively, of the passenger traffic volume in the Company’s airports. In addition, all of its assets are located, and all of its operations are conducted, in Mexico. Accordingly, the Company’s financial conditions and results of operations are substantially dependent on economic conditions prevailing from time to time in Mexico. As a result, its business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected by any deterioration of the general condition of the Mexican economy, by a devaluation of the peso, by inflation and high interest rates in Mexico or by other negative political, social and economic developments in Mexico.

In the past, Mexico has experienced economic crises, caused by internal and external factors, characterized by exchange-rate instability (including large devaluations), high inflation, high domestic interest rates, economic

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contraction, a reduction of international capital flows, a reduction of liquidity in the banking sector and high unemployment rates.

The Mexican economy underwent an economic crisis that began in 2008 and continued in 2009 as a result of the impact of the global financial crisis, which affected many emerging economies. The Mexican economy’s link with the U.S. economy remains very important, and therefore, any downside to the economic outlook of the U.S. may hinder any recovery in Mexico. This correlation may have an impact on Mexico’s GDP growth and other macro-economic conditions. The Mexican economy achieved real GDP growth rates of -8.5%, -0.1% and 2.0% in 2020, 2019 and 2018, respectively, and is estimated to increase by 4.3% in 2021 and to grow by 2.5% in 2022, according to the World Economic Outlook published by the International Monetary Fund in January 2021.

During 2020, average reference interest rates in Mexico decreased by 253 basis points compared to 2019. The annualized interest rates on 28-day short-term Mexican treasury bills, or Cetes (Certificados de la Tesorería de la Federación), averaged approximately 4.2%, 6.7%, 7.6%, 7.8% and 5.3% for 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020, respectively. To the extent that the Company incurs peso-denominated debt in the future, it could be at high interest rates.

If inflation or interest rates increase significantly or if the Mexican economy is otherwise further adversely impacted, the Company’s business, financial condition, prospects and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected because, among other things, demand for transportation services may decrease. Similar events may occur, and the recurrence of such events may adversely affect the Company’s business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition.

Political conditions in Mexico, could materially and adversely affect the Mexican economy and political climate and, in turn, the operations of the Company.

Last presidential and federal congressional elections in Mexico were held on July 1, 2018. President López Obrador’s term will expire on September 30, 2024. Historically, the Mexican president has strongly influenced new policies and governmental actions that impact the Mexican economy. We cannot assure you that the current administration or any other future administration will maintain business-friendly and open-market economic policies and policies that stimulate economic growth and social stability. Any administration could implement substantial changes in law, policy and regulations in Mexico, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. In addition, any actions taken by the administration may lead to riots, protests and looting that could adversely affect our operations. Our financial condition and results of operation may be adversely affected by changes in Mexico’s political climate, to the extent that such changes affect the nation’s economic policies, growth, stability, outlook or regulatory environment.

In addition, following the congressional elections on July 1, 2018, Morena obtained an absolute majority in the Mexican Chamber of Deputies and, together with its allied political parties (Partido del Trabajo and Partido Encuentro Social), obtained a majority in the Mexican Senate. The current members of the Mexican Congress took office on September 1, 2018. We cannot assure you that Morena and its political party allies or any future members will not introduce new legislative initiatives or modify existing legislation that could, in turn, result in economic or political conditions that could materially and adversely affect our business. On June 6, 2021, a number of electoral processes will take place including mid-term elections for the Mexican Chamber of Deputies as well as governor elections in fifty states, including six of the states in which we operate our airports, which could lead to changes in the composition of the Mexican Chamber of Deputies as well as of the governing party in those states in which where we operate. Changes in laws, public policies or regulations may affect the political and economic environment in Mexico and, consequently, contribute to economic uncertainty and heightened volatility of the Mexican capital markets and in securities issued by Mexican companies.

Furthermore, our business may be adversely affected by fluctuations in the value of the U.S. dollar as compared to the Mexican peso, inflation, interest rates, changes in laws and other political or social developments in Mexico over which we have no control. Any of the above may have an adverse effect on Mexico’s economic situation and, in turn, on our business, results of operations, financial condition and ability to repay our indebtedness.

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Adverse domestic events could negatively impact the Company’s business and results of operations.

The operations of our airports may be disrupted due to the actions of third parties, such as protestors or demonstrators, which are beyond our control. Any disruption in our operations, or adverse consequence resulting from protests or riots, including flight delays, a work stoppage or other similar event, may have a material adverse effect on the operation of our airports and on our results of operations.

Demonstrations and riots taking place in cities where our airports are located and where they are either a potential target or in the path of such demonstrations could generate flight cancellations and the suspension of our operations and could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition.

Depreciation of the peso relative to the U.S. dollar could adversely affect the results of operations and financial condition of the Company.

From December 31, 2018 to December 31, 2019, the peso appreciated from Ps.19.64 per U.S.$1.00 on December 31, 2018 to Ps.18.86 per U.S.$1.00 on December 31, 2019, an appreciation of 3.9%. From December 31, 2019 to December 31, 2020, the peso depreciated from Ps.18.86 per U.S.$1.00 on December 31, 2019 to Ps.19.89 per U.S.$1.00 on December 31, 2020 During the first months of 2021, the peso depreciated, reaching Ps.19.87 per U.S.$1.00 on April 22, 2021.

A depreciation of the peso affects the Company’s business in the following ways: (i) international passengers and international flights pay tariffs reported in U.S. dollars; while these tariffs are generally collected in Mexican pesos up to 60 days following the date of each flight, any depreciation of the Mexican peso has a positive impact on the Company’s results from operations, which are reported in Mexican pesos; (ii) the Company has cash balances denominated in U.S. dollars; a depreciation in the Mexican peso would result in higher cash balances when converted to Mexican pesos, thus causing foreign exchange gains; and (iii) the Company has financial liabilities denominated in U.S. dollars; a depreciation in the Mexican peso results in higher debt balances when converted to Mexican pesos, thus causing foreign exchange losses. As of December 31, 2020, the Company had U.S.$4.1 million of liabilities denominated in U.S. dollars, representing 1.1% of its consolidated debt. As of March 31, 2021, U.S.$80.2 million of the Company’s cash balance was denominated in U.S. dollars.

Moreover, the depreciation of the peso also affects some of the Company’s airline customers transacting in U.S. dollars, including the purchases or leases of equipment, maintenance and fuel. Severe devaluation or depreciation of the peso may also result in the disruption of the international foreign exchange markets and may limit the Company’s ability to transfer or to convert pesos into U.S. dollars and other currencies.

High incidences of crime in Mexico, including extortion and drug trafficking, could adversely affect the Company’s business.

Higher incidences of crime throughout Mexico, including extortion and drug trafficking, could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition, as it may decrease the international and domestic passenger traffic directed to or within Mexico. The travel warning issued by the U.S. Department of State (Bureau of Consular Affairs) on September 8, 2020 (the “Travel Advisory”) urges U.S. citizens not to travel to the states of Colima, Guerrero, Michoacán, Sinaloa (except the city of Mazatlán), and Tamaulipas. This Travel Advisory also urges U.S. citizens to defer non-essential travel to cities, states and other regions, such as Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, areas of the state of Jalisco that border the states of Michoacán, Mexico State, Morelos, Nayarit, Nuevo León (including the metropolitan area of Monterrey), San Luis Potosí, the eastern edge of Sonora which borders the state of Chihuahua, and Zacatecas. Drug-related violence and other incidents of organized crime may not be contained, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, prospects and financial condition.

In January 2019, the Mexican government implemented measures to reduce the theft of fuel transported in pipelines operated by Mexican state-owned entity Petróleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) throughout Mexico. As a result of these measures, certain states in Mexico, such as Mexico, Hidalgo, Querétaro, Guanajuato, Jalisco, Tamaulipas and Nuevo León, were affected by a shortage of gasoline for automobile use. Even though there were no shortages of

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aircraft fuel as a result of the actions implemented by the Mexican government, we cannot assure that future actions taken by the Mexican government against theft of fuel will not affect the availability of aircraft fuel in states where our airports are located, which, in turn, could have an adverse effect on our operations.

The value and prices of securities issued by Mexican companies, including us, may be adversely affected by developments in other countries.

The market value of securities of Mexican companies, including us, may be, to varying degrees, affected by economic and market conditions in other countries. Although economic conditions in these countries may differ significantly from economic conditions in Mexico, investors’ reactions to developments in any of these other countries may have an adverse effect on the market value of securities of Mexican issuers. In past years, prices of both Mexican debt and equity securities have been adversely affected by the sharp drop in Asian securities markets and the economic crises in Argentina, Brazil, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Russia, Spain, Venezuela and the United Arab Emirates.

In addition, economic conditions in Mexico have become increasingly correlated to economic conditions in the United States. Therefore, an economic downturn in the United States will significantly adversely impact the Mexican economy. Furthermore, on January 20, 2021 Mr. Joseph R. Biden became the 46th president of the United States. The Company cannot assure you that any policies adopted by the new U.S. administration will not have an impact in the market value of its securities, or that the market value of its securities will not be adversely affected by events elsewhere.

Delays in the process of obtaining necessary governmental approvals could affect the ability to expand the airports of the Company.

The expansion, development and growth of the Company’s airports from time to time may require governmental approvals, administrative proceedings or some other governmental action. Any delay or inability to obtain such approvals or favorable outcomes of such proceedings could have a negative impact on the expansion, development and growth of the Company’s airports.

Mexico’s environmental legislation could limit the growth of some of our airports.

The level of environmental regulation in Mexico is increasing and the enforcement of environmental laws has become more common. For instance, Mexico launched a carbon dioxide (“CO2”) market in 2018. The market requires that industries that generate above a certain amount of CO2 emissions pay for rights to excess emissions. Starting in 2019, the legislation also requires that companies report their global emissions as verified by the Mexican Emissions Registry (Registro Nacional de Emisiones). In addition, new water quality standards are being discussed, which would require greater water quality for all of our wastewater disposal. There can be no assurance that environmental regulations or their enforcement will not change in a manner that could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, prospects or financial condition.

According to the Mexican Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources (Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales) norm NOM-SEMARNAT-059-2010, mangroves are protected species, and it is a criminal offense to remove such species. Within the grounds of our Acapulco and Zihuatanejo airports, we have extended areas with mangroves, which may limit our potential to expand such airports.

The Mexican National Water Commission (Comisión Nacional del Agua) has the authority to restrict water use in some of our airports due to water shortage in northern Mexico and has enhanced its mechanisms to verify compliance with the fiscal, administrative and technical requirements regarding the extraction and discharge of water. Concessionaires who fail to comply with any of these requirements may be subject to administrative procedures that may result in the cancellation of water extraction rights and /or the imposition of significant fines.

Furthermore, twelve of our airports have received the Environmental Quality Certification awarded by the Federal Office for the Protection of the Environment (Procuraduría Federal de Protección al Ambiente). Our Monterrey airport is in the process of obtaining this certification, which is expected to be received in 2021. However, compliance with current or future environmental regulations may require us to incur additional costs in order to bring our airports

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into compliance, and if we fail to comply with current or future environmental regulations, we may be subject to fines and other sanctions.

On August 11, 2014, the Mexican National Agency of Industrial Safety and Protection of the Environment of the Hydrocarbons Sector (Agencia Nacional de Seguridad Industrial y de Protección al Medio Ambiente del Sector Hidrocarburos, or “ASEA”) was created. While initially taking a secondary role to the role of the Mexican Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources, ASEA has started to enforce its legal powers. Our airport growth projects related to fuel supply must now be approved by ASEA, which may result in more burdensome proceedings for the approval of special projects related to hydrocarbons. As of the date of this report, there can be no assurance whether ASEA’s rules and regulations will materially affect our business or results of operations.

Minority shareholders may be less able to enforce their rights against the Company, its directors or controlling shareholders in Mexico.

Under Mexican law, the protections afforded to minority shareholders are different from those afforded to minority shareholders in the United States. For example, there are no precedent cases in which Mexican courts found that the directors violated their fiduciary duties. As a result, it may be difficult for minority shareholders to bring an action against directors for breach of these duties and achieve the same results as in most jurisdictions in the United States. Procedures for class-action lawsuits were incorporated into Mexican law and became effective in March 2012. However, these rules and procedures are different and more limited than those in place in the United States. Therefore, it may be more difficult for minority shareholders to enforce their rights against the Company, its directors or its controlling shareholders.

Enforcing civil liabilities against us or our directors, officers and controlling persons may be difficult.

We are organized under the laws of Mexico, and almost all of our directors, officers and controlling persons reside in Mexico. In addition, a substantial portion of our assets and the assets of our directors, officers and controlling persons are located in Mexico. As a result, it may be difficult for investors to effect service of process on such persons within the United States or elsewhere outside of Mexico or to enforce judgments against us or our directors, officers and controlling persons, including in any action based on civil liabilities under U.S. federal securities laws. There is doubt as to the enforceability in Mexico, whether in original actions or in actions to enforce judgments of U.S. courts or other courts outside of Mexico, of liabilities based solely on U.S. federal securities laws.

Mexican law and the bylaws of the Company restrict the ability of non-Mexican shareholders to invoke the protection of their governments with respect to their rights as shareholders.

As required by Mexican law, the Company’s bylaws provide that non-Mexican shareholders shall be considered as Mexicans in respect of their ownership interests in the Company and shall be deemed to have agreed not to invoke the protection of their governments in certain circumstances. Under this provision, a non-Mexican shareholder is deemed to have agreed not to invoke the protection of his own government by asking such government to interpose a diplomatic claim against the Mexican government with respect to the shareholder’s rights as a shareholder, but is not deemed to have waived any other rights it may have, including any rights under the U.S. securities laws, with respect to its investment in the Company. If you invoke such governmental protection in violation of this agreement, your shares could be forfeited to the Mexican government.

The Company is subject to different corporate disclosure standards than U.S. companies.

A principal objective of the securities laws of the United States is to promote full and fair disclosure of all material corporate information. However, there may be less publicly available information about foreign issuers of securities listed in the United States than is regularly published by or about U.S. issuers of listed securities.

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Risks Related to Our Shareholders

SETA controls our management, and its interests may differ from those of other shareholders.

As of the date of this report, Fintech Holdings, Inc., Bagual S.à r.l. (“Bagual”), Grenadier S.à r.l. (“Grenadier”), Pequod S.à r.l. (“Pequod”), Harpoon S.à r.l. (“Harpoon”), Expanse S.à r.l. (“Expanse”), together (“Fintech”), through their direct subsidiary SETA, are the beneficial owners of 14.7% of our total capital stock. SETA directly owns Series B shares representing 1.9% of our total capital stock and owns Series BB shares that represent 12.8% of our capital stock. As long as SETA retains at least 7.65% of our capital stock in the form of Series BB, all of its special rights, including its right to nominate, appoint and remove certain directors and officers as holder of Series BB shares, will remain in place. The rights and obligations of SETA in our management are explained in “Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions—Major Shareholders.”

The termination of the Technical Assistance Agreement would also trigger the conversion of SETA’s remaining Series BB shares into Series B shares, resulting in the termination of all of SETA’s special rights. As long as the Technical Assistance Agreement remains in effect and SETA continues to hold at least 7.65% of our capital stock in the form of Series BB shares, it also has the right to appoint and nominate the same number of directors and officers that it is currently entitled to appoint under our bylaws. For further information on the Technical Assistance Agreement and its terms, see “Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions—Related Party Transactions—Arrangements Relating to SETA.”

SETA’s continuing veto rights as holder of at least 7.65% of our capital stock in the form of Series BB shares and its right to nominate, appoint and remove certain directors and officers as holder of Series BB shares, which will continue for as long as it owns at least one Series BB share and the Technical Assistance Agreement remains in effect, could adversely impact our operations and constitute an obstacle for us to bring in a new strategic shareholder and/or operator. With the right to nominate, appoint and remove certain members of our senior management, SETA directs the actions of our management in areas such as business strategy, financing, distributions, acquisitions and dispositions of assets or businesses. Should SETA’s shares fall below this threshold, our management could change significantly, and our operations could be adversely affected as a result. In the event of termination of the Technical Assistance Agreement, SETA would cease to have the special rights of the Series BB shares, which may adversely affect and disrupt our operations.

On September 14, 2020, Empresas ICA, S.A.B. de C.V. and Controladora de Operaciones de Infraestructura, S.A. de C.V. (“CONOISA”) filed Amendment No. 9 amending the Schedule 13D filed with the SEC, informing that prior to June 12, 2020, SETA was a wholly-owned subsidiary of ICA Tenedora,. S.A. de C.V. (“ICATEN”). On June 10, 2020, each of Bagual, Grenadier, Pequod, Harpoon and Expanse entered into a Stock Purchase Agreement with ICATEN and in the case of Bagual, a Stock Purchase Agreement with each of ICATEN and ICA Infraestructura, S.A. de. C.V. (a subsidiary of ICATEN), to purchase collectively 100% of the capital stock of SETA. The transactions closed on June 12, 2020 and the aggregate purchase price for the SETA shares was Ps. 5.47 per share for 862,703,377 shares.

The interests of SETA, Fintech, or any new controlling shareholder, may differ from those of our other shareholders and can be contrary to the preferences and expectations of our other shareholders. SETA and the officers nominated or appointed by it may not exercise their rights in ways that favor the interests of our other shareholders. Furthermore, as a result of our board’s decision-making process, officers appointed by SETA may influence decisions taken by the rest of our officers.

Risks Related to Our ADSs

You may not be entitled to participate in future preemptive rights offerings.

Under Mexican law, if we issue new shares for cash as part of a capital increase, we generally must grant our shareholders the right to purchase a sufficient number of shares to maintain their existing ownership percentage in the Company. Rights to purchase shares in these circumstances are known as preemptive rights. We may not legally be permitted to allow holders of ADSs in the United States to exercise any preemptive rights in any future capital increase,

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unless we file a registration statement with the SEC with respect to that future issuance of shares or the offering qualifies for an exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

At the time of any future capital increase, we will evaluate the costs and potential liabilities associated with filing a registration statement with the SEC and any other factors that we consider important to determine whether we will file such a registration statement.

We may not file a registration statement with the SEC in the future to allow holders of ADSs or shares in the United States to participate in a preemptive rights offering. In addition, under current Mexican law, sales by the depository of preemptive rights and distribution of the proceeds from such sales to you, the ADS holders, is not possible. As a result, your equity interest in the Company may be diluted proportionately.

Holders of ADSs are not entitled to attend shareholders’ meetings, and they may only vote through the depositary.

Under Mexican law, a shareholder is required to deposit its shares with the Secretary of the Company, S.D. Indeval Institución para el Depósito de Valores, S.A. de C.V. (“Indeval”), a Mexican or foreign credit institution or a brokerage house in order to attend a shareholders’ meeting. A holder of ADSs will not be able to meet this requirement, and accordingly is not entitled to attend shareholders’ meetings. A holder of ADSs is entitled to instruct the depositary as to how to vote the shares represented by ADSs, in accordance with the procedures provided for in the deposit agreement, but a holder of ADSs will not be able to vote its shares directly at a shareholders’ meeting or to appoint a proxy to do so.

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This Form 20-F contains forward-looking statements. We may from time to time make forward-looking statements in our annual and periodic reports to the SEC on Forms 20-F and 6-K, in our annual report to shareholders, in offering circulars and prospectuses, in press releases and other written materials and in oral statements made by our officers, directors or employees to analysts, institutional investors, representatives of the media and others. Examples of such forward-looking statements include but are not limited to:

projections of operating revenues, net comprehensive income (loss), net income (loss) per share, capital expenditures, dividends, capital structure or other financial items or ratios,

statements of our plans, objectives or goals,

changes in our regulatory environment,

statements about our future economic performance or that of Mexico, and

statements of assumptions underlying such statements.

Words such as “believe,” “anticipate,” “plan,” “expect,” “intend,” “target,” “estimate,” “project,” “predict,” “forecast,” “guideline,” “should” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements but are not the exclusive means of identifying such statements.

Forward-looking statements involve inherent risks and uncertainties. We caution you that a number of important factors could cause actual results to differ materially from the projections, plans, objectives, expectations, estimates and intentions expressed in such forward-looking statements. These factors, some of which are discussed above under “Risk Factors,” include material changes in the performance or terms of our concessions, developments in legal proceedings, economic and political conditions and government policies in Mexico or elsewhere, inflation rates, exchange rates, regulatory developments, customer demand and competition. We caution you that the foregoing list of factors is not exclusive and that other risks and uncertainties, including the duration and severity of the COVID-19 outbreak and its impacts on our business; may cause actual results to differ materially from those in forward-looking statements.

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Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and we do not undertake any obligation to update them in light of new information or future developments.

Item 4.          Information on the Company

HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE COMPANY

Grupo Aeroportuario del Centro Norte, S.A.B. de C.V., which we refer to by the acronym “GACN”, is a corporation (sociedad anónima bursátil de capital variable) organized under the laws of Mexico. We were incorporated in 1998 as part of the Mexican government’s program for the opening of Mexico’s airports to private investment. The duration of our corporate existence is indefinite. We are a holding company and conduct substantially all of our operations through our subsidiaries. The terms “GACN”, “the Company”, “we”, “us” and “our” in this annual report refer to Grupo Aeroportuario del Centro Norte, S.A.B. de C.V., together with its subsidiaries, and to properties and assets that we own or operate, unless otherwise specified. Our registered office is located at Plaza Metrópoli Patriotismo, Piso 5, Av. Patriotismo 201, Col. San Pedro de los Pinos, Benito Juárez, Ciudad de México, México 03800, telephone +52.81.8625.4300. Our U.S. agent is Puglisi & Associates. Our U.S. agent’s address is 850 Library Avenue, Suite 204, Newark, Delaware 19711.

The SEC maintains a World Wide Web site on the Internet at http://www.sec.gov that contains reports and information statements and other information regarding us. The reports and information statements and other information about us can also be downloaded from the SEC’s website or our website at http://www.oma.aero.

Investment by SETA and Its Affiliates

In 2000, as part of the first stage of our privatization, the Mexican government sold Series BB shares to SETA in a public bidding process. Pursuant to this transaction, SETA paid the Mexican government a total of Ps.864,055,578 (amount in nominal pesos, excluding interest) (U.S.$76.0 million based on the exchange rate in effect on the date of SETA’s bid) in exchange for:

all of our Series BB shares, which in 2000 represented 15.0% of our outstanding capital stock;
an option to acquire from the Mexican government shares representing 36.0% of the capital stock in 2000. This option was subsequently assigned to and exercised by Aeroinvest (currently CONOISA);
an option to subscribe for up to 3% of newly issued Series B shares (1% of which expired unexercised on June 14, 2005, and 2% of which was exercised in September 2006); and
the right and obligation to enter into various agreements with us and the Mexican government, including a participation agreement setting forth the rights and obligations of each of the parties involved in the privatization (including SETA) (the “Participation Agreement”), a 15-year Technical Assistance Agreement setting forth SETA’s right and obligation to provide technical assistance to us in exchange for an annual fee and a shareholders’ agreement under terms established during the public bidding process. These agreements are described in greater detail under “Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related-Party Transactions.”

Currently, Series BB shares represent 12.8 % of our capital stock and the remainder consist of Series B shares.

SETA’s current shareholders are:

Fintech, through its wholly-owned subsidiaries , which own directly 100% of SETA. Bagual owns 19.6% of the capital stock of SETA; Grenadier owns 21.5% of the capital stock of SETA; Pequod owns 21.5% of the capital stock of SETA; Harpoon owns 20.4% of the capital stock of SETA and Expanse owns 17.1% of the capital stock of SETA. On June 10, 2020, each of the wholly-owned subsidiaries previously mentioned entered into a Stock Purchase Agreement with ICATEN and in the

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case of Bagual, a Stock Purchase Agreement with each of ICATEN and ICA Infraestructura, S.A. de. C.V. (a subsidiary of ICATEN), to purchase collectively 100% of the capital stock of SETA.  The transactions closed on June 12, 2020 and the aggregate purchase price for the SETA shares was 5.47 Mexican pesos per share for 862,703,377 shares. SETA currently owns all of the outstanding Series BB shares representing 12.8% of our capital stock and also owns Series B shares representing 1.9% of our total capital stock.

Under the Technical Assistance Agreement, SETA provides management and consulting services and transfers industry expertise and technology to us in exchange for a fee, which in 2020 amounted to approximately Ps.81,164 thousand. This agreement is more fully described in “Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related-Party Transactions.”

Initial Public Offering

On November 29, 2006, a Mexican trust established by Nacional Financiera, S.N.C., or NAFIN (a Mexican national credit institution and development bank owned and controlled by the Mexican Government), acting pursuant to the instructions of the Ministry of Communications and Transportation, sold 48.02% of our outstanding capital stock through a global public offering of shares in the form of ADSs and Series B shares, concurrently in the United States and Mexico. The net proceeds from the sale of the shares totaled approximately U.S.$432.2 million and were paid to the Mexican government.

Master Development Programs and Capital Expenditures

Master Development Program

Every five years, we are required to submit to the Ministry of Communications and Transportation for approval a Master Development Program for each of our concessions describing, among other matters, our traffic forecasts for the following 15 years, and detailed expansion, modernization and major and minor maintenance plans for the following five years. Each Master Development Program is required to be updated and resubmitted for approval to the Ministry of Communications and Transportation every five years. Upon such approval, the Master Development Program is binding for the following five years and deemed to constitute part of the relevant concession. Any major construction, renovation or expansion of an airport generally may only be made pursuant to a concession holder’s Master Development Program and upon approval by the Ministry of Communications and Transportation. In November 2020, the Ministry of Communications and Transportation approved the Master Development Programs for each of our subsidiary concession holders for the 2021 to 2025 period. These five-year Master Development Programs, which were approved by the Ministry of Communications and Transportation, are in effect from January 1, 2021 until December 31, 2025, and we are required to comply with them on a year-by-year basis. We do not expect the COVID-19 pandemic to affect our committed investments under the current Master Development Programs.

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The following table sets forth our committed investments, including major maintenance expenditures, under our Master Development Programs by airport for 2021 through 2025. Figures are updated based on the Producer Price Index for the construction industry:

Committed Investments Under Master Development Programs by
Airport for 2021 through 2025
(1)

For the Year Ended December 31, 

    

    

    

    

    

    

Total

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2021 - 2025

(in thousands of pesos)

Acapulco

 

169,017

54,220

45,189

19,988

40,858

 

329,272

Ciudad Juárez

 

233,915

202,913

313,188

195,768

62,014

 

1,007,799

Culiacán

 

279,206

301,991

333,872

72,891

88,512

 

1,076,472

Chihuahua

 

188,108

166,830

210,734

116,083

72,699

 

754,453

Durango

 

73,650

112,310

82,069

44,354

24,791

 

337,173

Mazatlán

 

79,162

70,696

131,412

15,272

40,001

 

336,542

Monterrey

 

947,082

1,336,164

1,238,833

1,871,495

1,688,744

 

7,082,318

Reynosa

 

104,664

44,173

44,805

35,838

28,960

 

258,440

San Luis Potosí

 

154,519

83,211

90,005

51,135

29,798

 

408,668

Tampico

 

104,325

69,792

54,446

10,940

51,502

 

291,004

Torreón

 

82,090

110,730

38,894

27,978

33,258

 

292,950

Zacatecas

 

71,296

24,093

18,759

16,843

22,386

 

153,377

Zihuatanejo

 

78,468

77,944

18,534

31,542

51,943

 

258,432

Total

 

2,565,502

 

2,655,068

 

2,620,741

 

2,510,125

 

2,235,465

 

12,586,901


(1)In pesos with purchasing power as of December 2020.

The following table sets forth our committed investments, including major maintenance expenditures, under our Master Development Programs by category for 2021 through 2025:

Committed Investments Under Master Development Programs by

Category for 2021 through 2025 (1)

For the Year Ended December 31, 

    

    

    

    

    

    

Total

2021

2022

2023

2024

2025

2021 - 2025

(in thousands of pesos)

Terminal capacity expansions and quality projects

 

610,054

1,051,955

1,295,208

1,444,221

1,438,497

 

5,839,936

Projects to meet ICAO directives

 

236,096

139,842

14,053

10,260

9,502

 

409,753

Operational Infrastructure Expansion

 

190,178

176,799

158,040

209,535

313,502

 

1,048,054

Runways and aprons

 

371,483

441,930

348,335

284,352

135,296

 

1,581,395

Machinery and equipment

 

437,868

527,027

198,793

159,582

217,715

 

1,540,984

Security, Safety and Information Technology Equipment

 

388,412

156,264

544,285

361,149

81,534

 

1,531,644

Other

 

331,412

161,252

62,027

41,027

39,418

 

635,135

Total

 

2,565,502

 

2,655,068

 

2,620,741

 

2,510,125

 

2,235,465

 

12,586,901


(1)In pesos with purchasing power as of December 2020.

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Expenditures Under the Master Development Programs and Other Strategic Capital Expenditures

Expenditures incurred to comply with our obligations under the Master Development Programs include expenditures associated with improvements to our concession assets, major maintenance costs and other items recorded as operating costs as incurred. Major maintenance expenditures are not subject to capitalization and reduce our major maintenance provision. See “Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects—Critical Accounting Policies—Major Maintenance Provision.” Thus, not all expenditures incurred to comply with our obligations under the Master Development Programs will constitute capital expenditures.

In addition to investments in our Master Development Programs, we have also invested in commercial, real estate and other business opportunities, including our investment in hotels in Terminal 2 of the Mexico City International Airport and in the Monterrey airport, as well as our industrial park in the Monterrey airport.

The following table sets forth our actual capital expenditures, including capital expenditures made pursuant to our Master Development Programs and other strategic capital expenditures by airport for 2016 through 2020:

Actual Capital Expenditures by Airport for 2016 through 2020

For the Year Ended December 31, 

    

2016

2017

    

2018

    

2019

2020

(in thousands of pesos)

Acapulco

 

77,069

372,253

 

279,099

 

12,221

34,592

Ciudad Juárez

 

10,005

33,404

 

9,096

 

29,839

78,794

Culiacán

 

9,896

44,389

 

34,035

 

65,480

40,919

Chihuahua

 

16,202

122,448

 

141,908

 

173,576

37,908

Durango

 

4,478

19,991

 

13,788

 

48,932

47,209

Mazatlán

 

19,632

30,222

 

31,306

 

37,812

23,805

Monterrey

 

98,585

505,445

 

282,514

 

244,038

748,245

Reynosa

 

23,944

127,353

 

153,562

 

63,443

30,191

San Luis Potosí

 

24,553

108,757

 

231,726

 

71,716

53,596

Tampico

 

32,157

46,742

 

26,169

 

111,210

50,152

Torreón

 

5,834

20,017

 

19,990

 

9,105

29,400

Zacatecas

 

7,789

19,174

 

9,656

 

17,555

29,443

Zihuatanejo

 

25,822

28,138

 

13,587

 

105,374

74,516

Other

 

173,427

103,626

 

67,927

 

58,625

122,714

Total

 

529,393

1,581,959

 

1,314,363

 

1,048,926

1,401,483

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The following table sets forth our actual capital expenditures by category across all of our airports for 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020:

Actual Capital Expenditures by Category for 2016 through 2020

For the Year Ended

December 31, 

2016

2017

 

2018

2019

2020

(in thousands of pesos)

Capacity and quality project

140,989

 

882,289

961,580

598,829

946,848

Projects to meet ICAO directives

13,412

 

113,561

71,813

52,345

57,788

Facilities for disabled passengers

820

 

628

7,289

591

Environmental projects

6,616

 

12,429

6,655

3,350

4,279

Projects requested by competent authorities

2,283

 

8,216

4,126

692

16,806

Runways and aprons

12,552

 

1,735

220,647

95,033

Machinery and equipment

11,657

 

2,863

15,413

8,672

Operative standards equipment

19,669

 

78,735

25,804

10,027

33,475

Security — investments

7,287

 

27,309

6,074

17,305

29,398

Information systems — investments

5,565

 

58,545

43,738

16,972

14,432

Baggage-screening system — investments

775

 

81,942

12,538

820

22,363

Other

307,768

 

313,707

174,746

112,527

171,798

Total

529,393

 

1,581,959

1,314,363

1,048,926

1,401,483

In 2018, 2019 and 2020, our major maintenance expenditures totaled Ps. 139,320 thousand, Ps.305,133 thousand, and Ps.103,704 thousand, respectively. For a detailed reconciliation of expenditures actually made during 2018, 2019 and 2019 and their classification in our consolidated financial statements for such periods, see “Item 5 Operating and Financial Review and Prospects—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Principal Uses of Capital.”

Our actual capital expenditures from 2018 through 2020 were allocated to the following types of investments at the majority of our airports:

Terminals. We started the construction of five building expansions, and we completed the construction of three expansion projects in 2019 and 2020. We also improved our airports’ terminals by, among others, updating our lighting and air conditioning systems, replacing our fire detection and suppression equipment, installing new elevators and escalators and upgrading our public information systems.
Paved surfaces. We performed major rehabilitation work on our runways, taxiways and service roads to meet ICAO standards, including the modernization of our illuminated navigation aid systems to improve the safety of our airports. We expanded several aircraft aprons for general and commercial aviation, particularly at the Monterrey airport. We also completed construction of two taxiways at each of the Culiacan airport and Monterrey airport, two new car rental facilities at each of the Monterrey and Acapulco airports, an expansion of the Chihuahua airport parking lot, and a new parking lot at Ciudad Juarez airport. We began the construction of three new parking lots at the Monterrey airport.
Machinery and equipment. We invested in machinery and equipment such as aircraft-approved fire-extinguishing vehicles, emergency back-up electricity generators, metal detectors and other security-related equipment. We purchased operational and passenger ground vehicles and completed construction of a new power main substation at the Acapulco airport. We also began the renewal of our runway light technology from halogen to solar LED in Reynosa, Tampico, Acapulco, Monterrey and Durango airports. We began the construction of a new electrical substation at the Monterrey airport.
Baggage-screening system – investments. We updated the screening equipment in six of our airports to facilitate compliance with the new baggage-screening guidelines that require a comprehensive screening process for the detection of explosives.

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OMA-VYNMSA Industrial Park at the Monterrey airport. We continued with the expansion of our OMA-VYNMSA industrial park located at the Monterrey airport. As of December 31, 2020, we had a total construction of 9 warehouses with a total leasable area of 58,940 square meters (634,426 square-feet), of which all warehouses have already been leased and are currently in operation with lease terms ranging from 40 to 144 months. Construction of an additional warehouse with an area of 4,849 square meters (52,192 square-feet) was completed in January 2021.

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

Our Operations

Through our subsidiaries, we hold concessions to operate, maintain and develop 13 airports in Mexico, which are concentrated in the country’s central and northern regions. Each of our concessions has a term of 50 years beginning on November 1, 1998. The term of each of our concessions may be extended by the Ministry of Communications and Transportation under certain circumstances for up to 50 additional years. The terms of our concessions also include the right to occupy, use and improve the land appurtenant to our airports, which we do not own and which will revert to the Mexican government upon the termination of our concession. As operator of the 13 airports under our concessions, we charge fees to airlines, passengers and other users for the use of the airports’ facilities. We also derive rental and other income from commercial and diversification activities conducted at our airports, such as the leasing of space to restaurants and retailers, the operation of parking facilities, the operation of the OMA Carga business, the Terminal 2 NH Collection Hotel and the Hilton Garden Inn Hotel at the Monterrey airport, among others.

We operate 13 airports, which serve a major metropolitan area (Monterrey), three tourist destinations (Acapulco, Mazatlán and Zihuatanejo), seven regional centers (Chihuahua, Culiacán, Durango, San Luis Potosí, Tampico, Torreón and Zacatecas) and two border cities (Ciudad Juárez and Reynosa). Our airports are located in nine of the 32 Mexican states, covering a territory of approximately 926,421 square kilometers (575,667 square miles), with a population of approximately 29.0 million according to the Mexican National Institute of Statistics and Geography. All of our airports are designated as international airports under Mexican law, meaning that they are all equipped to receive international flights and to maintain customs and immigration services managed by the Mexican government, as well as refueling services.

According to figures published by the AFAC, our total aviation passenger traffic accounted for approximately 14.2% of all arriving and departing total aviation passengers in Mexico in 2020.

In 2020, we recorded revenues of Ps.5,367,466 thousand (U.S.$269,604 thousand) and consolidated net income of Ps.1,097,879 thousand (U.S.$55,146 thousand), the sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues was Ps. 4,113,597 thousand (U.S.$206,623 thousand) and our airports handled approximately 11.1 million terminal passengers, a decrease of 52.3% with respect to the 23.2 million terminal passengers handled in 2019.

Our airports serve several major international routes, including Monterrey-Houston, Monterrey-Dallas, San Luis Potosí-Dallas, Monterrey-San Antonio, Chihuahua-Dallas, Mazatlán-Los Angeles, Mazatlán-Phoenix, Monterrey-Atlanta, Zihuatanejo-Los Angeles and Monterrey-Las Vegas. Our airports also serve several other major international destinations, including Dallas, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Detroit, Minneapolis, Denver, Miami, New York, San Jose California and Phoenix in the United States, Havana, Cuba and Panama City. In addition, our airports serve major resort destinations, such as Acapulco, Mazatlán and Zihuatanejo, which are popular destinations in Mexico frequented by tourists from Mexico, the United States and Canada. Our airports also serve major domestic routes, including Monterrey-Mexico City, which was the country’s busiest domestic route in 2020, with approximately 1.6 million total passengers (including passengers flying directly to the nearby airport of Toluca, which are counted together with those flying to Mexico City), according to the AFAC. Other major domestic routes served by our airports include Cancún-Monterrey, Tijuana-Culiacán and Chihuahua-Mexico City, with approximately 832,462, 608,145 and 406,554 total passengers, respectively, in 2020, according to the AFAC.

Our international traffic in 2020 decreased by 56.9% compared to 2019, principally as a result of temporary suspensions in the operations of United Airlines’ Monterrey-Houston route, American Airlines’ Monterrey-Dallas route,

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Delta Airlines’ Monterrey-Atlanta route, United Airlines’ Monterrey-Chicago route, Alaska Airlines’ Mazatlán-Los Angeles route, Aeroméxico’ Monterrey-Los Angeles route, United Airlines’ San Luis Potosí-Houston route, Delta Airlines’ Monterrey-Detroit route, Aeroméxico’ Monterrey-New York route, Interjet’ Monterrey-Las Vegas route and Alaska Airlines’ Zihuatanejo-Los Angeles route.

Monterrey and its metropolitan area is the third largest city in Mexico based on population, with a population of approximately 5.0 million. Monterrey ranks among Mexico’s most established urban and commercial centers and is the capital of the state of Nuevo León, Mexico’s seventh largest state based on population. It is home to many of Mexico’s largest companies in a wide variety of industries, as well as several major universities. Business travelers account for a substantial portion of passengers at the Monterrey airport. The Monterrey airport is our leading airport based on passenger traffic volume, air traffic movements and contribution to revenues and ranked as the fifth busiest airport in Mexico based on passenger traffic volume in 2020, according to data published by the AFAC. In 2020, our Monterrey airport accounted for approximately 45.1% of our terminal passenger traffic, 47.7% of our total revenues and 42.7% of the sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues.

Three of our airports, Acapulco, Mazatlán and Zihuatanejo, serve popular Mexican tourist destinations. Acapulco is Mexico’s 24th largest tourist destination, Mazatlán is the 10th and Zihuatanejo is the 12th, based on the number of international visitors in 2020 according to the AFAC. Acapulco is a principal port of call for cruise ships. In 2020, the Acapulco, Mazatlán and Zihuatanejo airports collectively accounted for 13.2% of our aggregate terminal passengers, 11.4% of our total revenues and 12.4% of the sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues.

Seven of our airports serve small and mid-sized cities that are important regional centers of economic activity, with diverse economic activities such as mining (the Durango and Zacatecas airports), maquiladora manufacturing (the Chihuahua and Torreón airports), petroleum and chemical production (the Tampico airport), agriculture and livestock (the Culiacán airport) and transportation and logistics (the San Luis Potosí airport). In 2020, these seven regional airports collectively accounted for 32.5% of our aggregate terminal passengers, 27.6% of our total revenues and 28.8% of the sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues.

The remaining two airports in the group, the Ciudad Juárez and Reynosa airports, serve cities situated along the border of Mexico and the United States. Both Ciudad Juárez and Reynosa are popular entry points to the United States. In 2020, the Ciudad Juárez and Reynosa airports collectively accounted for 9.2% of our aggregate terminal passengers, 7.3% of our total revenues and 7.5% of the sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues.

Additionally, we operate four bonded warehouses under the OMA Carga brand that provide cargo logistics services, which include storage, handling, custody maneuvers, loading and unloading, and x-ray screening of exports, among other services. Two bonded warehouses operate at the Monterrey airport, one operates at the Ciudad Juárez airport and the other at the Chihuahua airport. 

We also have a 90% investment with a Mexican subsidiary of the international hotel operator NH Hoteles SA under Consorcio Grupo Hotelero T2, S.A. de C.V. to develop and operate a 287-room hotel and more than 5,000 square meters (53,820 square feet) of commercial space inside Terminal 2 of Mexico City International Airport under a lease agreement (the “Lease”) with Mexico City International Airport that expires in 2029. The Terminal 2 NH Collection Hotel opened in August 2009. Under certain circumstances, the Mexico City International Airport can terminate the Lease at any time with partial or no compensation to us.

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In November 2012, as part of our diversification activities, we signed a strategic alliance agreement with VYNMSA Desarrollo Inmobiliario, S.A. de C.V. (“VYNMSA”), to build and operate an industrial park at the Monterrey airport. As part of this strategic alliance, 32.4 hectares (80.06 acres) within the Monterrey airport’s perimeter are being developed in phases for use as an industrial park. The industrial park was inaugurated on March 20, 2015, and as of December 2020 we had built a total of 9 warehouses with a total leasable area of 58,940 square meters (634,426 square-feet), of which all warehouses have already been leased and are currently in operation with lease terms ranging from 40 to 144 months. An additional warehouse was developed, which construction ended in January 2021, with an area of 4,849 square meters (52,192 square-feet).

We also have an investment with Grupo Hotelero Santa Fe, S. de R.L. de C.V. (“Grupo Hotelero Santa Fe”), a Mexican hospitality investment and operating company, to develop and operate a 134-room hotel at the Monterrey airport under the Hilton Garden Inn brand. The hotel started operations on August 27, 2015.

We consider OMA Carga, our hotel operations and the operation of our industrial park a key part of our diversification strategy to increase our non-aeronautical revenues.

The following table provides summary data for each of our 13 airports for the years ended December 31, 2018, 2019 and 2020:

For the Year Ended December 31, 

2018

2019

2020

Aeronautical

Aeronautical

Aeronautical

Sum of

and Non-

Sum of

and Non-

Sum of

and Non-

Aeronautical

Aeronautical

Aeronautical

Aeronautical

Aeronautical

Aeronautical

and

Revenues

and

Revenues per

and

Revenues

Terminal

Non-Aeronautical

per Terminal

Terminal

Non-Aeronautical

Terminal

Terminal

Non-Aeronautical

per Terminal

Passengers

Revenues (1)

Passenger(2)

Passengers

Revenues(1)

Passenger (2)

Passengers

Revenues(1)

Passenger (2)

    

(Number

 

    

(in millions

    

    

    

(Number

    

    

(in millions

    

    

    

(Number

    

    

(in millions

    

    

(in pesos)

Airport

 

in millions)

%

 

of pesos)

%

(pesos)

 

in millions)

%

 

of pesos)

%

(pesos)

 

in millions)

%

 

of pesos)

%

Metropolitan destination:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Monterrey

 

10.7

 

49.8

%  

3,097.4

 

50.1

%

288.6

 

11.2

 

48.2

%  

3,367.7

 

48.5

%  

301.3

 

5.0

 

45.1

%  

1,757.6

 

46.7

%  

351.9

Total metropolitan destination

 

10.7

 

49.8

%

3,097.4

 

50.1

%

288.6

(3)  

11.2

 

48.2

%

3,367.7

 

48.5

%

301.3

(3)  

5.0

 

45.1

%

1,757.6

 

46.74

351.9

Tourist destinations:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Acapulco

 

0.7

 

3.4

%  

216.9

 

3.5

%

293.5

 

0.9

 

3.8

%  

268.2

 

3.9

%  

306.4

 

0.4

 

3.6

%  

144.4

 

3.8

%  

364.6

Mazatlán

 

1.0

 

4.9

%  

322.9

 

5.2

%

310.9

 

1.2

 

5.0

%  

374.2

 

5.4

%  

322.2

 

0.7

 

6.7

%  

248.6

 

6.6

%  

335.8

Zihuatanejo

 

0.6

 

2.6

%  

190.5

 

3.1

%

336.3

 

0.6

 

2.7

%  

217.1

 

3.1

%  

347.3

 

0.3

 

2.9

%  

117.0

 

3.1

%  

368.6

Total tourist destinations

 

2.3

 

10.9

%

730.3

 

11.8

%

311.6

(3)  

2.7

 

11.5

%

859.5

 

12.39

322.9

(3)  

1.4

 

13.2

510.0

 

13.56

350.80

Regional destinations:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

Chihuahua

 

1.6

 

7.2

%  

420.9

 

6.8

%

270.4

 

1.7

 

7.3

%  

478.4

 

6.9

%  

281.4

 

0.8

 

7.4

%  

261.8

 

7.0

%  

320.0

Culiacán

 

2.3

 

10.5

%  

596.9

 

9.6

%

262.8

 

2.5

 

10.6

%  

684.3

 

9.9

%  

278.3

 

1.4

 

12.4

%  

411.3

 

10.9

%  

299.5

Durango

 

0.4

 

1.9

%  

123.1

 

2.0

%

293.9

 

0.5

 

2.3

%  

163.6

 

2.4

%  

310.4

 

0.3

 

2.5

%  

90.6

 

2.4

%  

334.0

San Luis Potosí

 

0.6

 

2.9

%  

197.3

 

3.2

%

314.9

 

0.6

 

2.8

%  

210.0

 

3.0

%  

326.4

 

0.3

 

2.8

%  

136.6

 

3.6

%  

441.5

Tampico

 

0.7

 

3.4

%  

217.4

 

3.5

%

295.1

 

0.7

 

3.2

%  

225.2

 

3.2

%  

304.7

 

0.3

 

2.4

%  

91.7

 

2.4

%  

338.7

Torreón

 

0.7

 

3.2

%  

207.1

 

3.3

%

303.8

 

0.7

 

3.1

%  

225.1

 

3.2

%  

317.7

 

0.3

 

2.9

%  

112.3

 

3.0

%  

350.1

Zacatecas

 

0.4

 

1.7

%  

117.6

 

1.9

%

320.4

 

0.5

 

2.1

%  

155.4

 

2.2

%  

327.1

 

0.2

 

2.1

%  

81.8

 

2.2

%  

352.1

Total regional destinations

 

6.7

 

30.8

%

1,880.3

 

30.3

%

282.4

(3)  

7.2

 

31.3

2,142.0

 

30.9

295.4

(3)  

3.6

 

32.5

1,186.1

 

31.5

329.9

Border destinations:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

Ciudad Juárez

 

1.4

 

6.3

%  

356.2

 

5.8

%

261.1

 

1.6

 

6.9

%  

436.3

 

6.3

%  

273.1

 

0.8

 

7.1

%  

237.4

 

6.3

%  

300.5

Reynosa

 

0.5

 

2.2

%  

121.7

 

2.0

%

260.6

 

0.5

 

2.1

%  

131.8

 

1.9

%  

274.2

 

0.2

 

2.1

%  

69.5

 

1.8

%  

303.5

Total border destinations

 

1.9

 

8.5

%

477.9

 

7.8

%

261.0

(3)  

2.1

 

9.0

568.1

 

8.2

273.4

(3)  

1.0

 

9.2

306.9

 

8.2

301.2

Sum of aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues(1)

 

21.6

 

100

6,185.8

 

100

%

286.8

(3)  

23.2

 

100

6,937.3

 

100

299.4

(3)  

11.1

 

100

%

3,761

 

100

339.9


(1)Defined as the sum of aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues for each airport, which does not include eliminations among our subsidiaries and does not include revenues from construction services. Revenues in millions rounded to the decimal.
(2)Revenues per terminal passenger are calculated by dividing the sum of aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues for each airport by the number of terminal passengers for each airport. The result has been rounded to the decimal.

(3)Represents average total revenues per terminal passenger for the applicable airports.

See Note 25 to our consolidated financial statements for further information by segment. The Company’s reportable segments under IFRS include its airports, the Terminal 2 NH Collection Hotel, the Hilton Garden Inn Hotel and the OMA-VYNMSA Industrial Park, individually, and information about our holding company and service companies has been combined in the “other” line item, as they represent other business activities and are segments that are not required to be reported separately. For purposes of analysis, segments are comprised of our two hotels and thirteen individual airports, which have been grouped into four different regions according to their location: metropolitan, tourist, regional and border airports.

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Our Sources of Revenues

Aeronautical Services

Aeronautical services represent the most significant source of our revenues. All of our revenues from aeronautical services are regulated under the maximum-rate price regulation system applicable to our airports. In 2018, 2019 and 2020, aeronautical services revenues represented approximately 65.0%, 67.5% and 54.8%, respectively, of our total revenues and 76.0%, 76.0% and 71.5%, respectively, of the sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues.

Our revenues from aeronautical services are derived principally from: passenger charges, landing charges, aircraft parking charges, charges for the use of passenger walkways and charges for the provision of airport security services. Aeronautical services revenues are principally dependent on the following factors: passenger traffic volume, the number of air traffic movements, the weight of the aircraft, the duration of an aircraft’s stay at the airport, the time of day the aircraft operates at the airport and the specific prices charged for the service.

Passenger Charges

We collect a passenger charge for each departing passenger on an aircraft (other than diplomats, infants and transfer and transit passengers) called the Tarifa de Uso de Aeropuerto. We do not collect passenger charges from arriving passengers. Passenger charges are included in the cost of a passenger’s ticket and we issue invoices for those charges to each airline on a weekly basis and record an account receivable for the invoice corresponding to a flight during the actual month of the flight.

The current agreements between our airports and our principal airline customers provide that payments for passenger charges will be between 30 and 60 days after the invoice delivery date. In 2020, the weighted average term of payment was 48 days.

International passenger charges are currently U.S. dollar-denominated but are collected in pesos based on the average exchange rate during the month prior to the flight, and the value of our revenues from those charges is therefore affected by fluctuations in the value of the U.S. dollar as compared to the peso. Domestic passenger charges are peso-denominated. In 2018, 2019 and 2020, passenger charges represented approximately 86.5%, 86.6% and 81.6%, respectively, of our aeronautical services revenues, 56.2%, 58.5% and 44.7%, respectively, of our total revenues and 65.7%, 65.9% and 58.4%, respectively, of the sum of aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues. Passenger charges vary at each airport and based on the destination of each flight.

Aircraft Landing Charges

We collect landing charges from all carriers including cargo carriers for their use of our runways and taxiways, illumination systems on the runways and taxiways and other visual landing assistance services. Our landing charges are different for each of our airports and are based on each landing aircraft’s weight (determined as an average of the aircraft’s weight without fuel and maximum takeoff weight), the time of the landing, the origin of the flight and the nationality of the airline or client. In 2018, 2019 and 2020, these charges represented approximately 4.0%, 4.0% and 5.0%, respectively, of our aeronautical services revenues, 2.6%, 2.7% and 2.7%, respectively, of our total revenues and 3.0%, 3.0% and 3.6%, respectively, of the sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues.

Aircraft Parking, Boarding and Unloading Charges and Aircraft Long-Term Parking Charges

We collect various charges from all carriers including cargo carriers for the use of our facilities by their aircraft and passengers after landing. We collect aircraft parking charges based on the time an aircraft is at an airport’s gate or parking position. Each of these charges varies based on the time of day or night that the relevant service is provided (with higher fees generally charged during peak usage periods and at night), the aircraft’s maximum takeoff weight, the origin and destination of the flight and whether the service is domestic or international. We collect aircraft parking charges the entire time an aircraft is on our aprons.

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We collect charges from carriers for the long-term use of facilities at our airports for aircraft long-term parking that does not involve the loading or unloading of passengers or cargo. These charges are based on the time of day or night the aircraft is parked at our facilities, the length of time the aircraft is parked at our facilities and whether the service is domestic or international. Together with our aircraft parking, boarding and unloading charges described above, in 2018, 2019 and 2020, these charges represented approximately 3.4%, 3.2% and 4.2%, respectively, of our aeronautical services revenues, 2.2%, 2.2% and 2.3%, respectively, of our total revenues and 2.5%, 2.5% and 3.0%, respectively, of the sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues.

Passenger Walkway Charges

Airlines are also assessed charges for the connection of their aircraft to our terminals through a passenger walkway and for the transportation of passengers between terminals and aircraft via buses and other vehicles. These charges are generally based on the amount of time each service is used, the number of these services used, the time of day the services are used, the origin and destination of the flight and the nationality of the airline or client. In 2018, 2019 and 2020, these charges represented approximately 0.9%, 0.8% and 0.7%, respectively, of our aeronautical services revenues, 0.6%, 0.6% and 0.4%, respectively, of our total revenues and 0.7%, 0.6% and 0.5%, respectively, of the sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues.

Airport Security Charges

We also assess an airport security charge, which is collected from each airline, based on the number of its departing terminal passengers (excluding infants, diplomats and transit passengers), for use of our x-ray equipment, metal detectors and other security equipment and personnel. These charges are based on the time of day the services are used, the number of departing passengers and the destination of the flight. Independent subcontractors provide airport security services at our airports. In 2018, 2019 and 2020, these charges represented approximately 1.1%, 1.1% and 1.0%, respectively, of our aeronautical services revenues, 0.7%, 0.7% and 0.6%, respectively, of our total revenues and 0.8%, 0.8% and 0.7%, respectively, of the sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues.

The ICAO, the AFAC and the Office of Public Security issue guidelines for airport security in Mexico. In response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States, we have taken additional steps to increase security at our airports. The ICAO issued directives in October 2001 establishing new rules and procedures to be adopted at our airports. Under these directives, these rules and procedures were to be implemented immediately and for an indefinite period of time.

Several of our airline customers have also contributed to the enhanced security at our airports as they have adopted new procedures and guidelines established by the ICAO applicable to airlines. Some measures adopted by the airlines included adding more points for verification of passenger identification, inspecting luggage prior to check-in and reinforcing controls over access to airplanes by various service providers (such as baggage handlers and food service providers).

The ICAO established security guidelines requiring checked baggage on all international commercial flights as of January 2006, and all domestic commercial flights as of July 2006, to undergo a comprehensive screening process for the detection of explosives. Our subsidiary, Servicios Complementarios del Centro Norte, S.A. de C.V., has operated the checked-baggage screening system since March 1, 2012. In some countries, such as the United States, the federal government (in the case of the United States, through TSA) is responsible for screening checked baggage. Under Mexican law, however, airlines are responsible for screening checked baggage. On May 1, 2014 and July 1, 2016, the AFAC published mandatory circulars CO SA-17.2/10 R3 and CO SA-17.9/16, respectively, which require that all airlines screen checked baggage and that all airports have screening equipment that complies with specified guidelines. Although Mexican law holds airlines liable for screening checked baggage, the purchase, installation and operation of equipment could increase our exposure to liability as a result of our involvement in the screening process. In addition, although we are not currently obligated to screen checked baggage, we could become obligated to do so, and thus become subject to potential liability, if Mexican law changes in the future. Revenues derived from checked baggage screening are classified as non-aeronautical revenues see “Item 4. Information on the Company—Our Sources of Revenue.”

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In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we have implemented, among others, the following measures, which increased airport costs and expenses during 2020:

installed disinfectant gel dispensers based on alcohol at a minimum of 70% in public areas and strategic points,
mandated the use of face coverings in all areas,
installed temperature checkpoints at entry points for passengers and airport personnel,
provided personal protection equipment (PPE) (facemasks, gloves, face shields) to all our airport personnel,
installed disinfectant mats to eliminate viruses and bacteria on footwear at the entrances to the terminals and offices,
installed protective acrylics to minimize the transmission routes of COVID-19 between passengers and personnel in the airport facilities, including at information modules and commercial areas, such as stores and rental companies,
installed physical barriers to ensure entry only and exit only flows,
distributed the questionnaire required by AFAC for the “Identification of Risk Factors in Travelers” in paper and electronic form,
increased the cleaning and sanitation cycles in all areas of our facilities, including through the increased use of disinfectants and the daily cleaning of transport equipment,
established guidelines for effective, efficient and recurrent supervision of compliance with health measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19,
displayed COVID-19 information, including national and international regulations regarding the pandemic and other relevant information, on all our airport information screens,
instituted work from home and staggered activity policies in certain departments, and
circulated to airport personnel informational materials on preventive measures and questionnaires to detect health risks.

Complementary Service Providers

At each of our airports, we earn revenues from charging access and other fees from third-party providers, ramp-handling and baggage-handling services, catering services, aircraft security, providers of aircraft maintenance and repair and fuel. These access fees are included in the revenues that are regulated under our maximum-rate price regulation system and are determined for each third-party service provider based on a percentage of their total revenues. We currently maintain contracts with 51 companies that provide the majority of these complementary services at our 13 airports.

Under the Mexican Airport Law, we are required to provide complementary services at each of our airports if there is no third party providing such services. If any service providers were to halt operations at any of our airports, we could be required to seek a new provider of these services or to provide these services ourselves.

On November 1, 1998, the Company entered into an agreement with the Mexican Airport and Auxiliary Services Agency (Aeropuertos y Servicios Auxiliares or “ASA”), pursuant to which the Company granted the agency access to the facilities at the Company’s airports for a nominal fee in order for ASA to buy, sell and supply fuel in such facilities. On July 21, 2018, the Mexican Bureau of Civil Aviation (currently AFAC) published a notice in the Federal Official Gazette clarifying the scope of Transitory Article Nine of the Regulations of the Mexican Airport Law, stating that as of the publication of the Hydrocarbons Law on August 11, 2014, the fuel market was to be considered open so that any interested party can distribute and sell Jet-A fuel. This clarification opens the possibility for third parties complying with the applicable legal requirements to provide fuel distribution and supply services within the airports operated by the Company. As of the date of this report, there are no third parties, other than ASA, providing fuel distribution and supply services within such airports.  

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Leasing of Space to Airlines

We derive aeronautical revenues from leasing space in our airports to airlines that is necessary for their operations, such as ticket counters and offices. Our lease agreements with airline customers for the use of space in our airports are typically for terms of three years with provisions for periodic inflation adjustments to our rental fees.

Cargo Handling

Cargo-related revenues include revenues from the leasing of space in the airside of our airports to cargo handling agents and shippers, landing fees for each arriving aircraft carrying cargo and a portion of the revenues derived from other complementary services provided in connection with cargo services. Cargo-related revenues are largely aeronautical and therefore subject to maximum rates applicable to aeronautical revenue sources.

Revenues from cargo handling in our airports historically have represented a negligible portion of our total revenues.

Permanent Ground Transportation

We receive revenues from ground transportation vehicles and taxi companies who pay an access fee to operate on our airport premises. Our revenues from providers of ground transport services deemed “permanent” under applicable Mexican law, such as access fees charged to taxis, are subject to price regulation.

Non-Aeronautical Services

General

Non-aeronautical services historically have generated a significantly smaller portion of our revenues as compared to aeronautical services. Our revenues from non-aeronautical services are principally derived from (i) commercial activities, such as the leasing of space in our airports to retailers, restaurants and other commercial tenants, maintaining and operating parking facilities and advertising; (ii) diversification activities, such as OMA Carga, hotel services, operation and lease of the industrial park and real estate services and (iii) complementary activities, which principally include the baggage-screening system and the leasing of space to airlines.

None of our revenues from non-aeronautical services are regulated under our maximum-rate price regulation system, though other authorities may regulate them. For example, our parking facilities may be subject to certain municipal regulations.

As one of the main parts of our business strategy, we have prioritized increasing our non-aeronautical revenues, seeking new and improved commercial prices at our airports, as well as the development of the diversification and complementary activities. As a result of our efforts during the last ten years, our non-aeronautical revenues have increased as a percentage of our revenues. In 2010, non-aeronautical revenues represented 14% of our total revenues, while in 2018, 2019, and 2020 non-aeronautical revenues accounted for approximately 20.6%, 21.3% and 21.8% of our total revenues, respectively. Non-aeronautical revenues represented 24.0%, 24.0%, 28.5% in 2018, 2019 and 2020, respectively, of the sum of our aeronautical and non-aeronautical revenues.

Revenues from Commercial Activities

As another main part of our business strategy to enhance our non aeronautical revenues, we have prioritized increasing our revenues per passenger from commercial activities in our airports through the development of new areas, introduction of new services, brands and promotion of the commercial services described below. As a consequence of the outbreak of COVID-19, our revenues from commercial activities decreased by 37.6% in 2020 as compared to 2019 as revenues from commercial activities are largely dependent on passenger traffic. In order to reduce the impact from the outbreak of COVID-19 and to position our commercial revenues for future growth as demand for air travel recovers, the following initiatives have been implemented or expanded:

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Expanding and reconfiguring the commercial space available in our airport terminals.  In order to increase our revenues from commercial activities, we have expanded and redesigned the layout of certain terminals in our airports to allow for the inclusion of more commercial businesses and larger individual commercial spaces, as well as to redirect the flow of passengers through our airports so as to increase passengers’ exposure to the commercial businesses operating in our airports.  As a result, during the last ten years, we increased the total area available for commercial activity in our 13 airports by approximately 59.7%, and have more than doubled the commercial area in the Monterrey airport.  As of December 31, 2020, the total area available for commercial activity at our 13 airports was 21,907.92 square meters (235,816.85 square feet), with an occupancy rate of 89.9%.
Supporting our commercial tenants through the effects of COVID-19 as a direct response to the pandemic, and ensuring that commercial services continue despite the pandemic by providing support programs, such as discounts and a payment deferral program, to certain commercial activities that were largely impacted by the decrease in passenger traffic. Such support programs are voluntary and solely to address the pandemic and do not represent ongoing obligations of the Company.
Renegotiating agreements with commercial tenants to be more consistent with market practice.  We improved our lease arrangements with existing tenants by adopting a new type of contract that provides for royalty payments based on a percentage of revenues, subject to a minimum fixed amount based partly on square footage, as opposed to the leases based solely on square footage that were used historically in Mexican airports.  We estimate, based on the nature of our commercial tenants, that approximately 57% of our commercial contracts are subject to royalty-based leasing arrangements.
Improving the quality of retail offerings in our airports.  Historically, commercial tenants in our terminals consisted of small, often similar, local businesses offering goods and services of limited variety.  We have leased redesigned space formerly occupied by such tenants, as well as newly available space, to more established, internationally recognized businesses in order to improve the quality, diversity and brand recognition of commercial goods and services available to our passengers, which we believe, based in part on market surveys conducted at several of our airports, will increase the sales revenues of our commercial tenants, thereby increasing our revenues from commercial activities.  As a result, our food and beverage service tenants currently offer internationally recognized brands such as Starbucks, Chili’s, Carl’s Jr, Krispy Kreme, Urban Corner, Sbarro and Gastro Hub.  In order to promote commercial development at all of our airports, we encourage commercial tenants to lease bundles of commercial spaces among multiple airports that we operate.
Providing timely commercial information. We use social media to communicate the commercial opportunities and activities at our airports on a daily basis. We believe that good communication is the best method to promote our commercial services. We advertise current deals and new commercial services and, in some cases, we offer seasonal deals in coordination with our tenants.
Improving travel experience.  Our commercial team works together with our operational team, airline clients and commercial tenants to devise customer-oriented solutions to deliver a better experience for all our passengers.

Commercial activities in each of our airports currently consist of the following:

Parking facilities. Our concessions provide us the right to operate the car parking facilities at all of our airports. Revenues from parking facilities at our airports currently are not regulated under our maximum rates, although they are subject to the regulatory oversight of the Ministry of Communications and Transportation. In 2020, we increased parking lot capacity at the Monterrey airport by adding 343 spaces, we opened a new parking lot at the Ciudad Juárez airport, with 201 spaces for long term stays, which increased existing spaces from 300 to 501.
Advertising. On October 4, 2018, we signed a lease and advertising services agreement with ISA Corporativo, SA de CV (“ISA”), effective as of October 4, 2018 through December 31, 2025.

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Retail and duty free. We have completed several renovation projects as part of our overall effort (described above) to improve the product mix and brand recognition of retail stores in the commercial areas at our airports. We also have several duty-free retailers that cater to international passengers.
Food and beverage services. Through the years, we have upgraded our restaurant and bar offerings, which has allowed us to attract world-class operators of food and beverage outlets offering a wide variety of cuisine options and service concepts.
Car rentals. We have internationally known name-brand car rental providers at our airports and have encouraged car rental companies to establish on-site automobile pick-up and drop-off facilities at our airports.  We have also encouraged our car rental providers to differentiate their VIP services and modernize their facilities.
Time-share marketing and hotel promotion. We receive revenues from time-share developers and hotels to whom we rent space in our airports for the purpose of marketing and sales of time-share units as well as provide hotel transportation services.
Financial services. We lease space to financial services providers (such as currency exchange bureaus, banks and ATMs) at our airports, and we charge providers of these financial services fees based partly on a percentage of the revenues recorded by their operations.  ATM service is currently available at all of our airport terminals.
Communications. We offer telephone, mobile phone and internet services at our airports through contractual agreements with service providers and offer wireless internet access at all of our airports.
VIP Lounges. We lease space for the OMA Premium Lounge in the Monterrey, Mazatlán, Culiacán, Chihuahua, Acapulco and San Luis Potosí airports and for the American Express-Centurion VIP Lounge and CitiBanamex Beyond Lounge in the Monterrey airport, which provide their frequent flyers a luxury waiting lounge with comfortable seating, internet service, television and free newspapers, among other amenities.

Revenues from Diversification Activities

To enhance our non-aeronautical revenues, we also focus our business strategy on generating new services and products to diversify our revenue sources, such as our OMA Carga business, hotel services and real estate services.  We develop land not intended for aeronautical purposes at our airports for industrial, logistical or commercial uses that are directly or indirectly related to airport activities in order to strengthen the airports’ role as focal points of economic development in the cities where they are located. 

As a consequence of the outbreak of COVID-19 our revenues from diversification activities decreased by 34.0% as compared to 2019. The following are our main diversification initiatives, of which, some of them were negatively affected during 2020:

Developments at Mexico City International Airport. In October 2008, we acquired 90% of the shares of Consorcio Grupo Hotelero Terminal 2, S.A. de C.V., which has the rights to develop and operate a 287-room hotel and approximately 5,000 square meters (53,820 square feet) of commercial space inside the new Terminal 2 of Mexico City International Airport, under a lease agreement with Mexico City International Airport that expires in 2029. A Mexican subsidiary of NH Hoteles SA, a Spanish company, owns the other 10%. The Terminal 2 NH Collection Hotel opened in August 2009. For the year ended December 31, 2020, total revenues decreased by 56.8% to Ps.110,299 thousand and annual average occupancy during such period was 40.2%, 4,390 basis points lower than in 2019. In 2020, the annual average rate per room was Ps.1,909.
Hotel at Monterrey Airport.  In July 2013, we partnered with Grupo Hotelero Santa Fe, a Mexican hospitality investment and operating company, to develop and operate a 134-room hotel at the

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Monterrey airport under the Hilton Garden Inn brand. We own 85% of Consorcio Grupo Hotelero de Monterrey, S.A.P.I. de C.V. and Grupo Hotelero Santa Fe holds the remaining 15%.  The Hilton Garden Inn at the Monterrey airport includes a restaurant and bar, business centers and a fitness center and is easily accessible from Terminals A and B of the airport.  For the year ended December 31, 2020, total revenues decreased by 68.5% to Ps.32,614 thousand, compared to 2019, and annual average occupancy during such period was 36.1%, 4,160 basis points lower than in 2019.  In 2020, the annual average rate per room was Ps.2,288. The hotel suspended operations form April 6, 2020 to July 6, 2020 due to low occupancy derived from the outbreak of COVID-19.
OMA Carga Operations.  We operate four bonded warehouses that provide cargo logistics services, which include storage, handling, custody maneuvers, loading and unloading, and x-ray screening of exports, among other services. Two bonded warehouses operate at the Monterrey airport, one operates at the Ciudad Juárez airport and the other at the Chihuahua airport.  Total revenues from OMA Carga Operations decreased by 5.9 % to Ps.11,554 thousand, in comparison to revenues from 2019.  This decrease resulted from a reduction in volume of imports and exports mainly during COVID-19 lockdown periods in which manufacturing operations were temporally halted.
Shopping Center and Office Plaza.  Located in the outside areas of Terminal A of the Monterrey airport, the shopping center and office plaza consists of a two-story building with commercial space on the lower level and office space for rent on the upper level.
Gasoline Service Station at Monterrey Airport.  In December 2012, a gasoline service station within the Monterrey airport began operations.  The 2,500 square meters (26,910 square feet) of land on which the service station is located is identified for diversification activities and was leased to Grupo ORSAN, an authorized distributor of Mobil, for a renewable term of 15 years.  Grupo ORSAN is responsible for the operation of and all investments in the service station.  In 2020, the leasing of this land to Grupo ORSAN generated revenues of Ps.2,540 thousand.
Strategic Alliance with VYNMSA. In November 2012, we, through our subsidiary OMA Logística, signed a strategic alliance agreement with VYNMSA, to build and operate an industrial park at the Monterrey airport, through the company OMA-VYNMSA Aero Industrial Park, S.A. de C.V. in which OMA Logística has a 51% ownership interest and VYNMSA has a 49% ownership interest. As part of this strategic alliance, 32.4 hectares (80.06 acres) within the Monterrey airport’s perimeter are being developed in phases for use as an industrial park. The industrial park was inaugurated on March 20, 2015, and as of December 2020 we had built a total of 9 warehouses with a total leasable area of 58,940 square meters (634,426 square-feet), of which all warehouses have already been leased and are currently in operation with lease terms ranging from 40 to 144 months. An additional warehouse with an area of 4,849 square meters (52,192 square-feet) was developed, which construction ended in January 2021.
Office Center for Cargo Logistics Agents.  Leasing of 1,045 square meters (11,248 square feet) of space at the Monterrey airport with an occupancy rate of 91.4% as of December 31, 2020.

Revenues from Complementary Activities

Our complementary activities generated 16.9% of our non-aeronautical revenues in 2020. These include:

Leasing of space. Revenues that we derive from the leasing of space in our terminals to airlines and complementary service providers for certain activities that are not essential to airport operations, such as first class/VIP lounges, are not subject to price regulation under our maximum rates and are classified as non-regulated commercial activities.
Baggage-Screening Services. The ICAO established security guidelines requiring checked baggage on all international commercial flights as of January 2006 and all domestic commercial flights as of July 2006 to undergo a comprehensive screening process for the detection of explosives. We

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completed the purchase and installation of screening equipment in all of our airports in 2015 to facilitate our airline customers’ compliance with the baggage-screening guidelines. We negotiated an increase to maximum rates as of 2013 with the Federal Civil Aviation Agency to take into account the maintenance costs of baggage-screening systems in all of our airports required by mandatory circulars CO SA-17.2/10 R3 and CO SA-17.9/16. Our subsidiary Servicios Complementarios del Centro Norte, S.A. de C.V., has operated the checked-baggage screening systems at our airports since March 1, 2012. In 2020, our revenues from the operation of checked-baggage screening system service, which are not subject to maximum rates, amounted to Ps. 86,491 thousand.
Non-Permanent Ground Transportation. Our revenues from providers of ground transportation services deemed “nonpermanent” under applicable Mexican law, such as access fees charged to charter buses, are not subject to price regulation under our maximum rates and are classified as non-regulated commercial activities.
Access Rights. Revenues that we derive from granting access rights to transportation providers to terminal buildings at our airports are not subject to price regulation under our maximum rates and are classified as non-regulated commercial activities.

Our Airports

In 2018, 2019 and 2020, our airports served a total of approximately 21.6 million, 23.2 million and 11.1 million terminal passengers, respectively. All of our airports are designated as international airports under applicable Mexican law, meaning that they are equipped to receive international flights and maintain customs and immigration facilities operated by the Mexican government.

The following table sets forth the percentage of terminal passenger traffic generated at our airports per type of destination during 2018, 2019 and 2020:

Percentage of Total Passenger Traffic

 

Type of Destination

    

2018

    

2019

    

2020

 

Metropolitan (Monterrey)

 

49.8

%  

48.2

%  

45.1

%

Tourist (Acapulco, Mazatlán and Zihuatanejo)

 

10.9

%  

11.5

%  

13.2

%

Border (Ciudad Juárez and Reynosa)

 

8.5

%  

9.0

%  

9.2

%

Regional (Culiacán, Chihuahua, Durango, San Luis Potosí, Tampico, Torreón and Zacatecas)

 

30.8

%  

31.3

%  

32.5

%

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The following tables set forth the passenger traffic volume presented in amounts of (i) total passengers, (ii) terminal departing and arriving passengers and (iii) transit passengers, for each of our airports for the periods indicated:

Passenger Traffic

For the Year Ended December 31, 

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

    

Terminal(1)

    

Transit(2)

    

Total

    

Terminal(1)

    

Transit(2)

    

Total

    

Terminal(1)

    

Transit(2)

    

Total

    

Terminal(1)

    

Transit(2)

    

Total

    

Terminal(1)

    

Transit(2)

    

Total

Total passengers:

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

 

  

Acapulco

 

718,493

 

5,478

 

723,971

 

685,124

5,198

 

690,322

 

739,120

15,340

 

754,460

 

875,315

14,298

 

889,613

 

395,948

1,704

 

397,652

Ciudad Juárez

 

1,102,855

 

19,262

 

1,122,117

 

1,173,135

7,846

 

1,180,981

 

1,364,028

9,725

 

1,373,753

 

1,597,471

8,168

 

1,605,639

 

790,009

3,053

 

793,062

Culiacán

 

1,726,654

 

12,227

 

1,738,881

 

1,909,651

14,480

 

1,924,131

 

2,270,834

10,477

 

2,281,311

 

2,458,863

8,915